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Full text of "Analyses of iron meteorites compiled and classified"

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ILLINOIS STATE 

LABORATORY 
OF NATURAL HISTORY 

LIBRARY 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 




L I E) R.AR.Y 

OF THE 

UN IVLRS ITY 

or ILLl NOIS 



I^MtWRAL HISTORY SURVE 

550.5 
FI 

REMOTE 



.1 



Field Columbian Museum 

Publication 120 

Geological Series Vol. Ill, No. 5. 



ANALYSES OF IRON METEORITES 
COMPILED AND CLASSIFIED 



Oliver Cummings Farrington, 

Curator, Department of (Jeology 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
March i, 1907. 



ANALYSES OF IRON METEORITES 
COMPILED AND CLASSIFIED 

BY 

OLIVER CUMMINGS FARRINGTON 



Chemical analyses may be collected and grouped for purposes of 
record and of comparison. For the first purpose it is desirable that 
all known analyses of the substances under consideration be collected ; 
for the second, only those known to be complete and reliable are 
needed. A combination of these two purposes may perhaps be gained, 
however, by collecting all analyses and leaving to the judgment of the 
investigator the selection of those suited for the study of any par- 
ticular phase of the subject. This plan is practically that which has 
been adopted in presenting the analyses here collected. In many 
cases obviously incomplete analyses are given because they represent 
all that is known of the chemical constitution of the meteorite in 
question, or because they mark a stage in its study. On the other 
hand, analyses which amount to little more than a qualitative deter- 
mination of the presence of iron and nickel, or whose connection with 
a particular meteorite is uncertain, are omitted. About three hundred 
and sixty analyses are here included, and it is believed that they com- 
prise practically all of importance that have been made of iron 
meteorites. When more than one analysis of a meteorite is given, 
the analyses have been arranged chronologically. For the most part 
the later analyses are the most complete and reliable ones, though 
this is not always the case. Thus those by J. Lawrence Smith, 
although made thirty and in some cases forty years ago, accord well with 
what is known of the constitution of the iron meteorites at the present 
day and may be considered generally accurate and reliable. The 
same is true of analyses by Jackson, Berzelius, Damour, and others. 
As shown later, the relations between structure and composition 
brought out by the analyses as here grouped are so definite that at 
the present time a knowledge of the structure of a meteorite will give 
a more accurate idea of its composition than inferior chemical 
analyses. The general plan of arrangement which has been adopted 

59 



6o Field Columbian Museum — (iEOLoGV, Vol. III. 

for the analyses is that now generally known as the Rose-Tscherniak- 
Brezina classification. This seemed the classification most desirable 
to employ on account of its wide use, and when it was found, as will 
be seen by the tables, that the chemical constitution of the meteorites 
follows its main divisions, its adaptation to the work in hand seems 
unquestionable. Under each group of the classification the arrange- 
ment of the meteorites is alphabetical. Synonyms of the meteorite 
names will be found on subsequent pages. The characterization of 
the meteorite groups which head the tables have largely been sum- 
marized from Cohen.* In considering the analyses it should be 
realized that some of the groups are much better known than others. 
Thus the ataxites and hexahedrites were thorough' studied by Cohen 
and their composition satisfactorily determined. The fine octahed- 
rites have also been mostly investigated. The coarse and medium 
octahedrites, however, though more numerous than the groups just 
mentioned, are but imperfectly known and need detailed modern 
study. In a list following the tables meteorites of which no analy- 
sis is known are marked with an asterisk. These- number about 
forty. In addition, many meteorites, analyses of which are reported 
in the tables, have never in fact been properly studied. The only ex- 
tensive list of analyses of iron meteorites which has lately been previ- 
ously compiled of which the writer is aware is that of Wadsworth, 
published in 1884.7 This list includes one hundred and ninety-three 
analyses of iron meteorites and terrestrial irons, arranged in order of 
the per cent of nickel. No further attempt at classification is made. 
While Wadsworth's list is fairly complete as regards older analyses, 
it includes several pseudo-meteorites, and obviously does not ade. 
quately represent present knowledge. 

The first recorded attempt at analysis of an iron meteorite is 
probably to be found in the examination in 1802, by Count de Bournon, J 
of some so-called native irons from Bohemia, Senegal, and South 
America. In these Count de Bournon found percentages of nickel 
ranging from five to ten per cent, but it is stated by Howard else- 
where in the paper that owing to lack of knowledge of the pecu- 
liarities of nickel these figures are little more than estimates. The 
next year Klaproth § reported one and one-half to three and one-half 
per cent of nickel in the iron meteorite of Hraschina, and expressed 
the opinion that the presence of nickel might serve as a criterion for 

* Meteoritenkunde, Heft III. 

t The Rocks of the Cordilleras, Memoirs Museum Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass , 
Vol. .\I. Part I, pp. vi-.\vi, Table II. 

I Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc, London, 1802. 

^ .Abhandl. Akad. Wiss., Berlin, 1803, 21-41. 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 61 

judging the meteoric origin of a body. Cobalt was reported by 
Stromeyer in the iron meteorite of Cape of Good Hope in 1816,* and 
copper by the same investigator in 1833.J Stromeyer expressed the 
belief that copper was, with cobalt, a constant ingredient of meteoric 
nickel-iron, and this conclusion was later corroborated by SmithJ on 
the basis of more than one hundred analyses. Chromium was dis- 
covered as a component of meteoric nickel-iron by Laugier in 181 7. § 
The presence of manganese and tin in meteoric nickel-iron was also 
early reported. The presence ot other metals or semi-metals reported 
at different times, such as zinc, lead, arsenic, and antimony, has not 
been confirmed, while the presence of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, 
potassium, and sodium, noted by several analysts, is doubtless to be 
referred to small quantities of silicates which either formed a constitu- 
ent of the meteorite, as in Tucson, Tula, etc., or accidentally contami- 
nated the material analyzed. The occurrence of phosphorus in me- 
teoric nickel-iron seems first to have been noted by Berzelius Ij in the 
undissolved residue of Bohumilitz. It was similarily reported by 
analysts who followed Berzelius, but percentages were not commonly 
given until later times. Sulphur was early noted as an ingredient of 
meteoric stones and later of irons. Since it occurred as a soluble 
constituent, it was more often reported in the early analyses than 
phosphorus. The presence of carbon as graphite was noted by Ten- 
nant*' in 1806 in the Cape of Good Hope meteorite. Being, like the 
phosphides, insoluble, its presence was often later reported in insolu- 
ble residues, but its amount was rarely given. Silicon, as reported in 
the earlier analyses, whether as metal or oxide, is probably for the 
most part to be referred to accessory silicates. With later methods, 
however, its detection in small quantities as an ingredient of the 
nickel-iron has become possible. The first detection of chlorine as 
an essential constituent of iron meteorites seems to have been by Jack- 
son in 1838,** in the meteorite of Limestone Creek. Its presence has 
been occasionally but not commonly reported by later.analysts. Deter- 
minations of specific gravity of the iron meteorites examined seem to 
have been common. While these are probably for the most part fairly 
reliable, some of the values reported are too anomalous to seem 
trustworthy. 

* Gottingisclie Gelehrte .\nzeigen, 1816, 2041-2043. 
t Gottingische Gelehrte .Anzeigen, 1S33, 369-370. 

i Am. Jour. Science, 1870 (21, 49, 332. 
'f, Ann. Chem. Pharm., 1817, IV, 363-366. 
! Pogg. Ann., 1S32, XXVII, 128-132. 

* Tillochs Phil. Mag., London, 1806. XXV, 1S2. 
** Am. Jour. Science (i), 34, 332-317. 



62 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

IRON METEORITES. 

These are meteorites consisting essentially of nickel-iron. Most 
of them contain, in addition, an appreciable amount of sulphides, car- 
bides, and phosphides, but the presence of silicates in quantity removes 
a meteorite from this class. The iron meteorite of Tucson contains 
about five per cent of forsterite, and the meteorites of Kodaikanal, 
Persimmon Creek, and Tula also contain silicate aggregates, but in 
small quantities. In general, it may be said that if the quantity of 
silicate grains exceeds five per cent the meteorite is not considered 
as belonging to the class of iron meteorites. About two hundred and 
fifty iron meteorites are now recognized, the exact number being in- 
determinate on account of differences of opinion as to identity of 
origin in several cases. The chief divisions of iron meteorites, accord- 
ing to the Rose-Tschermak-Brezina classification, are hexahedrites, 
octahedrites, and ataxites. These are sub-divided as follows: 

CLASSIFICATION OF IRON METEORITES ACCORDING TO 
ROSE, TSCHERMAK, BREZINA, AND COHEN 

I. Hexahedrites. 

A. Normal hexahedrites. 

B. Brecciated hexahedrites. 
II. Octahedrites. 

A. Normal octahedrites. 

1. Coarsest octahedrites. 

2. Coarse octahedrites. 

3. Medium octahedrites. 

4. Fine octahedrites. 

a. Prambanan group. 
/>. Rodeo group. 

5. Finest octahedrites. 

a. Salt River group. 

(^. Tazewell group. 

c. Cowra and Victoria \Vest. 

B. Hammond octahedrites. 

C. Brecciated octahedrites. 
III. Ataxites. 

A. Nickel-poor ataxites. 

1. Si rati k group. 

2. Nedagolla group. 

3. Rafruti group. 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



63 



C. 
D. 



Nickel-rich ataxites. 

1. Smithland group. 

2. Cristobal group. 

3. Octibbeha. 
Ataxites with forsterite. 
Ataxites with cubic streaks. 



The 

follows : 



iron meteorites enumerated according to groups sum up as 

Octahedrites: 

Coarsest . 13 

Coarse 30 

Medium . 98 

Fine 33 

Finest 14 

Brecciated 6 

Hammond . 3 

Unclassified 4 

201 

Ataxites 30 

Hexahedrites 17 

Total 248 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF IRON METEORITES. 

The following is an alphabetical list of iron meteorites, showing 
the classification of each. An asterisk indicates that no analysis of 
the meteorite is reported. 

Abert Iron Medium octahedrite Bald Eagle Medium octahedrite 

*Adargas Medium octahedrite Ballinoo Finest octahedrite 

Algoma Medium octahedrite Barranca Blanca. . .Brecciated octahe- 

Ait Biela Fine octahedrite drite 

*Amates Medium octahedrite Beaconsfield Coarse octahedrite 

Angara Medium octahedrite Bear Creek Fine octahedrite 

*Apoala Fine octahedrite Bella Roca Fine octahedrite 

Arispe Coarsest octahedrite Bendego Coarse octahedrite 

Arlington Medium octahedrite Bethany Fine octahedrite 

Asheville Medium octahedrite Billings Coarse octahedrite 



Auburn Hexahedrite 

Augustinowka Fine octahedrite 

Babb's Mill Ataxite 

Bacubirito Finest octahedrite 



Bingera Hexahedrite 

Bischtube Coarse octahedrite 

Black Mountain Coarse octahedrite 

*Blue Tier Medium octahedrite 

Bohumilitz Coarse octahedrite 



64 



Field Columbian Museum — (iKOlogy, Vol. III. 



Boogaldi Fine octahedrite 

Botetourt Ataxite 

Braunau . . .■ Hexaliedrite 

Bridgewater Fine octahedrite 

Buckeberg Fine octahedrite 

Burlington Medium octahedrite 

Butler Finest octahedrite 



*Dellys Medium octahedrite 

Denton County Medium octahedrite 

Descubridora Medium octahedrite 

De Sotoville Hexahedrite 

Duell Hill Coarse octahedrite 



Elbogen Medium octahedrite 

El Capitan Medium octahedrite 

Cabin Creek Medium octahedrite *E1 Tule Medium octahedrite 

Cacaria Hammond octahe- *Emmitsburg Medium octahedrite 

drite 

Cachiyuyal Medium octahedrite 

Cambria Fine octahedrite 

Campo del Cielo. . .Ataxite 

Canton Coarsest octahedrite 

Canyon Diablo Coarsest octahedrite 

Canyon City Coarse octahedrite 

Cape of Good Hope . Ataxite 

Caperr Medium octahedrite 

Cape York Mediumloctahedrite 

Carlton Finest octahedrite 

Carthage Medium octahedrite 

Casas Grandes Medium octahedrite 

*Casey County Coarsest octahedrite 

Central Missouri. . .Coarsest octahedrite *Haniel el-Beguel. . .Medium octahedrite 
*Chanaral Coarse octahedrite Hassi Jekna Fine octahedrite 



Forsyth County Ataxite 

Fort Duncan Hexahedrite 

Fort Pierre Medium octahedrite 

Franceville Medium octahedrite 

Frankfort Medium octahedrite 

Glorieta Medium octahedrite 

Grand Rapids Fine octahedrite 

Greenbrier County. . Coarse octahedrite 

Groslee Fine octahedrite 

Guilford County Medium octahedrite 



Hammond Hammond 

drite 



octahe- 



"Hayden Creek Medium octahedrite 

Hex River Hexahedrite 

Holland's Store .'. . . Hexahedrite 
Hopewell Mounds. . Medium octahedrite 

Hopper Medium octahedrite 

Hraschina Medium octahedrite 

*Ilimae Medium octahedrite 

1 llinois Gulch Ataxite 

Indian Valley Hexahedrite 

Iquique Ataxite 

Iredell Hexahedrite 

I vanpah Medium octahedrite 

*Jackson County Medium octahedrite 

Jamestown Fine octahedrite 

Jennie's Creek Coarse octahedrite 

Jewel Hill Fine octahedrite 

Joel's Iron Medium octahedrite 

Joe Wright Medium octahedrite 

Jonesboro Fine octahedrite 

Juncal Medium octahedrite 

Dalton Medium octahedrite 

Deep Springs Ataxite Kendall County .... Hexahedrite 

Uehesa Ataxite Kenton County Mediumoctahedrite 



*L.harcas Medium octahedrite 

*Chambord 

Charlotte Fine octahedrite 

Chesterville Ataxite 

*Chichimeguilas 

Chilkoot Medium octahedrite 

Chulafinnee Medium octahedrite 

Chupaderos Fine octahedrite 

Cincinnati Ataxite 

Cleveland Medium octahedrite 

Coahuila Hexahedrite 

Colfax Medium octahedrite 

Coopertown Medium octahedrite 

Cosby Creek Coarse octahedrite 

Costilla Medium octahedrite 

Cowra Finest octahedrite 

=^ Cranberry Plains. . .Octahedrite 

Cranbourne Coarse octahedrite 

Cuba Medium octahedrite 

Cuernavaca '. . Fine octahedrite 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



65 



*Kodaikanal Fine octahedrite 

Kokomo Ataxite 

Kokstad Medium octahedrite 

La Caille Medium octahedrite 

Lagrange Fine octahedrite 

Laurens County Finest octahedrite 

Lenarto Medium octaliedrite 

Lexington County. .Coarse octahedrite 

Lick Creek Hexahedrite 

Limestone Creek. . .Ataxite 

Linville Ataxite 

Locust Grove Ataxite 

*Lonaconing Coarse octahedrite 

Losttovvn Medium octahedrite 

*Lucky Hill Medium octahedrite 

Luis Lopez Medium octahedrite 

*Madoc Fine octahedrite 

Magura Coarse octahedrite 

Mantos Blancos .... Finest octahedrite 
Marshall County. . . Medium octahedrite 

Mart Finest octahedrite 

Matatiela Medium octahedrite 

Mazapil Medium octahedrite 

Merceditas Medium octahedrite 

Misteca Medium octahedrite 

*Moctezuma Medium octahedrite 

*Mooranoppin Coarsest octahedrite 

Moonbi Fine octahedrite 

Morito Medium octahedrite 

Morradal Ataxite 

Mount Joy Hexahedrite 

*Mount Stirling Coarse octahedrite 

Mungindi Finest octahedrite 

Murfreesboro Medium octahedrite 

Murphy Hexahedtite 

*Nagy-Vazsony Medium octahedrite 

Narraburra Creek. .Finest octahedrite 

Nedagolla Ataxite 

Nejed Medium octahedrite 

Nelson County Coarsest octahedrite 

Nenntmannsdorf . . Ataxite 

N'Goureyma Brecciated octahe- 
drite 

Niagara Coarse octahedrite 

*Nochtuisk Coarse octahedrite 

*Nocoleche Medium octahedrite 

Oktibbeha County.. Ataxite 



Orange River Medium octahedrite 

*Oroville Medium octahedrite 

Oscuro Mountains.. Coarse octahedrite 

Pan de Azucar Coarse octahedrite 

*Persimmon Creek. .Brecciated octahed- 
rite 

Petropawlowsk Medium octahedrite 

Pittsburg Coarsest octahedrite 

Plymouth Medium octahedrite 

Ponca Creek Coarsest octahedrite 

Prambanan Fine octahedrite 

Primitiva Ataxite 

Puquois Medium octahedrite 

Putnam County .. ..Fine octahedrite 

Quesa Fine octahedrite 

Kafruti Ataxite 

*Rancho de la Pila. .Medium octahedrite 

Rasgata Ataxite 

Red River Medium octahedrite 

Reed City Hammond octahed- 
rite 

Rhine \'alley Medium octahedrite 

Rodeo Une octahedrite 

Roebourne Medium octahedrite 

*Rosario Octahedrite 

Rowton Medium octahedrite 

Ruff's Mountain. ...Medium octahedrite 
Russel Gulch Fine octaliedrite 

Sacramento Moun- 
tains Medium octahedrite 

St. Francois County. Coarse octahedrite 
St. Genevieve Coun- 
ty Fine octahedrite 

Salt River Finest octahedrite 

San Angelo Medium octahedrite 

San Cristobal Ataxite 

San Francisco del 

Mezquital Ataxite 

*Santa Apolonia. . . . 
Santa Rosa Brecciated octahe- 
drite 

Sao Juliao Coarsest octahedrite 

Sarepta Coarse octahedrite 

Schwetz Medium octahedrite 

Scottsville Hexahedrite 

Seelasgen Coarsest octahedrite 

Seneca Falls Medium octahedrite 



66 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Shingle Springs Ataxite 

*Sierra Blanca Coarse octahedrite 

Silver Crown Coarse octahedrite 

Siratik Ataxite 

Smithland Ataxite 

Smith's Mountain. .Fine octahedrite 

Smithville Coarse octahedrite 

Ssyromolotow Medium octahedrite 

Staunton .Medium octahedrite 

Summit Hexahedrite 

Surprise Springs. . .Medium octahedrite 

Tabarz Coarse octahedrite 

*Tajgha Medium octahedrite 

*Tanogami Medium octahedrite 

Tazewell Finest octahedrite 

*Teocaltiche Octahedrite 

Ternera Ataxite 

Thunda Medium octahedrite 

Thurlow Fine octahedrite 

*Tlacotepec Octahedrite 

Toluca Medium octahedrite 

Tonganoxie Medium octahedrite 

Toubil Medium octahedrite 

Trenton Medium octahedrite 

Tucson Ataxite 



Tula Brecciated octahe- 
drite 

*Union County Coarsest octahedrite 

Ute Pass Coarsest octahedrite 

Varas Fine octahedrite 

\'ictoria Medium octahedrite 

Victoria West Finest octahedrite 

*\Vallen's Ridge . . . .Coarse octahedrite 

Walker County Hexahedrite 

Weaver Ataxite 

Welland Medium octahedrite 

*Werchne D n i e p - 

rowsk Finest octahedrite 

Werchne Udinsk . .Medium octahedrite 
Wichita County. . . .Coarse octahedrite 

Willamette Medium octahedrite 

Wooster Medium octahedrite 

Yanhuitlan Fine octahedrite 

Yardea Station Medium octahedrite 

*York Medium octahedrite 

Youndegin Coarse octahedrite 

Zacatecas Brecciated octahe- 
drite 



SYNONYMS. 



The following are synonyms 
preceding list : 

Aeriotopos Bear Creek 

Agram Hraschina 

Ainsa Tucson 

Albuquerque Glorieta 

Allen County Scottsville 

Amakaken Caperr 

Arva Magura 

Atacama, 1858 Joel's Iron 

Atacama, 1874 Cachiyuyal 

Augusta County Staunton 

Bahia Bendego 

Baird's Farm Asheville 

Bates County Butler 

Batesville Joe Wright 

Bonanza Coahuila 

BrazC'S River Wichita 

Butcher Iron Coahuila 



of the iron meteorites given in the 

Caille La Caille 

Caney Fork Carthage 

Carleton Iron Tucson 

Catorze Descubridora 

Chatooga County Holland's Store 

Cherokee County, 1867 . Losttown 
Cherokee County,i8g4. Canton 

Chilkat Chilkoot 

Claiborne Lime Creek 

Cocke County Cosby Creek 

Concepcion Adargas 

Cross Timbers Red River 

Crow Creek Silver Crown 

Dakota Ponca Creek 

Ellenboro Colfax 

Floyd County Indian \'alley 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



67 



Floyd Mountain Indian Valley 

Great Fish River Bethany 

Green County Babb's Mill 

Hamilton County Carlton 

Hastings County Madoc 

Hauptmannsdorf Braunau 

Henry County, 1857. . .Locust Grove 
Henry County, 1889. . .Hopper 

Honduras Rosario 

Howard County Kokomo 

Independence County. Joe Wright 

Independence Kenton County 

Iron Creek Victoria 

Johnson County Cabin Creek 

Knoxville Tazewell 

La Primitiva Primitiva 

Lea Iron Cleveland 

Lime Creek, 1832 Walker County 

Lime Creek, 1834. Limestone Creek 

Lion River Bethany 

Lockport Cambria 

Miller's Run Pittsburg 

Muchachos Tucson 



Mukerop Bethany 

Netschaevo Tula 

Obernkirchen Buckeberg 

Oldham County La Grange 

Penkarring Rock Youndegin 

Ranchito Bacuburito 

Saltillo Coahuila 

Sanchez Estate Coahuila 

San Gregorio Morito 

Saskatchewan Victoria 

Senegal Siratik 

Serrania de Varas Varas 

Sierra de la Ternera. .Ternera 
Southeast Missouri. ...St. Francois County 

Teposcolula Yanhuitlan 

Tocavita Santa Rosa 

Tombigbee River De Sotoville 

Tucuman Campo del Cielo 

Waldron's Ridge Wallen's Ridge 

White Sulphur 

Springs Greenbrier County 

Whitfield County Dalton 

Wohler's Iron Campo del Cielo 



68 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



ANALYSES OF IRON METEORITES. 



I. HEXAHEDRITES. 

The hexahedrites are characterized by cubic cleavage and Xeu- 
mann lines. They consist of the single alloy kamacite, the composi- 
tion of which, FCj^ Ni, shows a close approximation to the iron-nickel 
content of the hexadedrites. The content of phosphorus in the hexa- 
hedrites is usually relatively high, }( to y^ percent. This appears char- 



XoRMAL 



Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr, 


P. 


?. 


C 


Si, 


CL 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneous. 


Auburn 


04. 1:8 


3.01 
4.67 

5-52 
5,21 
5.62 
2.10 
6.62 

4-79 
3-26 
7.42 

1 T T 








•13 
.46 


.002 


■52 












94 
nT 


49 
88 
62 

82 

90 

95 
62 

07 
86 
02 

14 
18 

41 
90 
02 
90 
58 
65 
.04 


1.03 

■53 
.92 
.60 
tr. 
.48 
.60 

■55 
.50 

in 


. lOI 


.024 




















2.07 


" Q3 

1 

Coaliuila '94 

(Bonanza) 97 

Butcher) 92 

iSallillo) 94 

iSanta Rosa> 96 

" " rvl 


■07 

tr. 
• 04 


.05 
tr. 
tr. 

tr. 


.24 

■29 
tr. 
.02 
.18 
1.05 
■27 
■32 
.29 
.20 
.14 
•23 


.08 


.09 












.06 













Mg. tr. 














tr. 




































95 
95 
95 
95 
94 
92 

91 
92 
94 
96 

95 


tr. 
.06 

•05 
tr. 


.16 












4 82 


.05 
.04 
• 04 


.01 










., 


.07 












1 ox 


7 1 






.02 






4.87' 

6.10 

7.03 

6 66 1 -^ 


tr. 


















1.80 




., 


















.. 






.28 
■23 










.01 






4.82 

311 
3-18 


1.07 
.42 

•35 


.04 


.04 


■32 










iSancha 1 








•57 




tr. 




• 24 





























March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



69 



acteristically in the hexahedrites in the form of rhabdite, and often c(jn- 
stitutes I J^ to 3 per cent of their mass. Another characteristic mineral 
of the hexahedrites is daubreelite. Graphite and troilite are rare, al- 
though the latter mineral occurs in some members of the group in visible 
nodules. The hexahedrites may be divided into normal and brecciated 
hexahedrites, according to whether they are one or several individuals. 

A. NORMAL HEXAHEDRITES. 

In these hexahedrites the cleavage planes and Neumann lines run 
without change of direction throughout the mass. 

IeXAHEDRI I'ES. 



Loss 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp.Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






98.24 

100.77 


7--7-I7 


C. U. Shepard 

0. Hildebrand 


1869, A. J. S. (2j, XLMI, 230-233 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, HI, 217 














I 00 . 00 


7.782 
7.8516 


Dutios & Fischer. . . 


1847, Ann. Phy. Chem., LXXH, 475-480 
1905! Meteoritenkunde, HI, 207 






.02 


100.30 


R. Knauer 








101.39 

100 00 


7.8678 

7.825 
7.692 


E. Cohen 


1894, Meteoreisen-Studien A. N. H., IX, 

i867,A.J.S. (2), XLni,385 

1869, A.J. S. (2;, XLVU,385 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, HI, 194 

1863, Ann. Phy. Chem., CXVHI, 631-634 

i885,A.J.S. (3), XXIX, 233 

1899, A.J. S. (4), VHI, 154 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, HI, 213 

Same 

Same 

1886, A.J. S. (3), XXXlb 306 

1887, C. R.,CI\', 872-873 
1893, B. S.H. N., VI, 17 
1889, Neues Jalirb., 227 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, HI, 194 


104 






C. U. Shepard 

J. L. Smith 

0. Biirger 






100.07 

100.22 
100.935 
100.05 
100 01 
















H. Wichelhaus. 










N. F. Lupton. 

J. E. Whitfield 

R. Knauer. . . 
















100.37 

100.50 
100.46 
100 00 












Hildebrand & Cohen 
Knauer & Cohen... . 

J. B. Mackintosh 

Meunier . 
















7-522 
7.699 
7-72 








99-92 
98-93 

100 26 
















E. Cohen 






.02 


loi .19 


7.84 


0. Hildebrand 








100. 14 
99-59 


8 n 


F A Gentli 


1854, A.J. S. (2),X\'H, 239-240 

1855, A.J. S. (2), XIX, 160-161 








7.81 


J L Smith 




1 







70 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Name. 



Hex River 

Iredell-..- 

Lick Creek 

Murphy 

Scottsville 

Walker County 



Fe. 



93 


33 




93 


59 




93 


75 




93 


oo 




93 


93 




94 


32 




93 


14 




94 


03 




94 


14 





Ni. 



58 
.68 

51 
■ 74 
.52 
.01 

■75 
•33 
■30 



Co. 



.84 
.66 

•52 
•52 
.61 
tr. 
•99 
■95 
.64 



Cu. 



.04 



tr. 



04 
06 



Cr. 



.02 
.05 



•23 

.20 

.36 

•34 
.16 

•15 
•23 
.28 



.08 
.06 
tr. 



■34 



.07 
.19 



.04 
. 12 



Si. 



CI. 



tr. 
.06 



In 



•03 



Miscellaneous. 



B. BRECCIATED HEXAHEDRITES. 

These hexahedrites are characterized by a structure which gives 
them the appearance of being aggregates of individual grains. Not 
only do apparent outlines of grains occur, but the directions of the 
Neumann lines are different on the different grains. The size of the 
grains differs in different falls, but is fairly uniform for meteorites 
of the same fall. The contour of the grains may be rounded, polygonal, 
elongated, or ragged, and as a rule the grains are sharply separated 
from one another. When the divisions between grains widen to a 
cleft, some accessory constituent usually occupies the gap. Acces- 
sory minerals are not, however, abundant. The presence of dau- 

Brecciated 



Bingera , 



Holland's Store. 



Indian Valley.. . . 
Kendall County. 

Mount Joy 

Summit 



Ke. 



03.76 




93-50 




93.06 




94.60 




93-59 




92.65 




93.80 




93-39 





•39 
■54 
•35 
•97 
56 
.64 
.81 
.62 



■ 57 

•51 

1 .00 

.21 

•53 
.78 

■51 
.58 



Cm. 



tr. 

•03 
.005 



Cr. 



23 



•23 
.26 

•31 
.21 

.27 

•34 
■19 
•31 



tr. 
.01 

■03 
.01 



c. 



.14 
•03 



1 .62 



Si. 



tr. 



CI. 



-54 



.08 



Miscellaneous. 



Na. tr. 

Sn. .02 Mil. Pt.lr.tr. 







March, 1907. 


Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 71 


^oss. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 


— 


■94 


100. 6q 

100.43 

100.04 

99.62 

100.52 

99-95 
100.13 
100.68 
I 00 . 66 




Cohen &Weinschenk 
R. Knauer 


1891, Meteoreisen-Studien A. N. H., \'I, 143 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 225 
1899, A.J. S. (4), VIII, 415-416 


7.8225 






J. E. Whitfield 

Smith & Mackintosh 

J. Fahrenhorst 

J. E. Whitfield 

Fischer 






1880, A. J. S. (3), XX, 324-326 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien A.N.H., X\', 368 






7.7642 
7-848 






1887, A.J. S. (3), XXXIII, 500 






1889, Neues Jahrb., I, 227 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 220 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 173 






7-7959 
7.7806 


R. Knauer 






0. Hildebrand 








iEXAHEDl 


breelite has not been noted, and schreibersite is not common, either in 
nodules or as rhabdite. The view that the brecciatetl hexahedrites are 
aggregates is not accepted by Brezina, except in the case of Kendall 
County. He regards the structure and cleavage of the other members 
of the division as uniform, and explains the varying orientation ascaused 
by twinning. Mount Joy, placed by Berwerth, Cohen, and Brezina 
among the coarsest octahedrites, because of an apparent octahedral 
structure observed by Berwerth, seems to the present writer to belong 
more properly to the hexahedrites. In composition and structure it 
agrees fully with the hexahedrites, and it shows no trace of cohenite, 
a characteristic mineral of the coarse octahedrites. Its individual 
grains are the largest of any of the following group: 

ilTES. 


>OSS. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Si> Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






99-63 

99.88 

100. I I 

99-99 
99.96 
loi .11 

99-33 
99.90 


7.834-7-849 
7.761 


A. Liversidge 

J. C.H. Mingaye 

Zaubitzer 

J. E. Whitfield 

L. G. Eakins 

Scherer 


188?, Proc. Roy. Soc. N. S. W., Xvl, 31-34 






1904, Rec. Geol. Sur. N. S. W., VII, 308-310 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 240 
1887, A.J. S.(3), XXXIV, 472 
i892,A. J.S.(3), XLIII, 424 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, A. N. H., X\', 387 
1892, A.J. S. (3), XLIV, 416 
1 890, A. J S.(3), XL,:,22 










7.801 

7-95 






. . . 








6.949 


L. G. Eakins 

F. P. Venable 























72 



FiKLD Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



II. OCTAHEDRITES. 



'I'he meteorites of this class are the most abundant among iron 
meteorites. According to the width of the lamellae as seen in etched 
sections, they are divided as follows: Coarsest octahedrites, lamellae, 
manv mm. to 2.5 mm. in width; coarse octahedrites, lamelh^ 2-1.5 
mm. in width; medium octahedrites, lamellce 1.0-0.5 mm. in width; 
fine octahedrites, lamelLie 0.4-0.2 mm. in width; finest octahedrites, 
lamella; from 0.2 mm. down. While no sharp line of separation can 
be drawn between these groups, the members of each group present as 
a rule characters more or less peculiar to themselves. As compared 
with the hexahedrites, the octahedrites differ in structure in being 
made up of lamellae arranged in accordance with the planes of the 
octahedron. These lamellae in turn are composed of two or more 
alloys of nickel-iron. In composition a higher percentage of nickel- 
cobalt may be noted among the octahedrites, as compared with the 
hexahedrites, and schreibersite and troilite are far more abundant 
than in the hexahedrites, Cohenite, which is not known to occur in 
the hexahedrites, is characteristic of certain groups of the octahe- 



COARSEST, 



Name. 



Fe. Ni. 



Arispe 

Canvon Diablo. , 



92.27 ,7.04 
95 -370 3 -945 
91.3967-94 



Canton • 91 .96 

Central Missouri... 94-73 
Nelson County .... 93. 10 

Pittsburi^- '92.81 

" 93-38 

Ponca Creek 



Sao Julifio. 
Seelasjren. 



91-74 
91.74 

89-39 
90.00 

92-33 



6.70 
4.62 
6.11 
4.66 

5.89 

6-53 
7.08 



Co. 



.50 
.18 
■41 
•39 
1.24 



8.27 



5-31 
6.23 



-43 

.67 



Cu. 



03 



Cr. 



.144 

.179 
. II 

• 44 

.05 

•25 
•15 
.01 
.01 
.26 



tr 

.004 
.01 
.02 



.04 

.07 



.417 



•52 



tr 

.047 
tr. 



1. 16 
.02 



CI. 



In- 



.26 



Miscellaneous. J , 



Mn 14 

Chromite. .07 

Sn 06! 

Sn 06 



Mn 91 

Cu. +Sn.. .o;| 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



73 



drites, while graphite and diamond are also largely confined to the 
octahedrites. Daubreelite and chromite, which are common con- 
stituents of the hexahedrites, are rare in the octahedrites. The 
nickel-cobalt content of the octahedrites varies from 5^ to JSH 
per cent. 

A. NORMAL OCTAHEDRITES. 

In the normal octahedrites the lamellar structure extends without 
change of direction, except for occasional curving, through the indi- 
vidual. This is true e^^en for large masses like those of Charcas, 
Chupaderos, and Willamette. 

I. COARSEST OCTAHEDRITES. 

^vidth of lamellne from many millimeters down to 2.5 mm. The 
nickel-cobalt content is as a rule slightly higher than in the hexa- 
hedrites, reaching in some cases 7 per cent. The presence of cohen- 
ite and graphite is characteristic of the group. Canyon Diablo con- 
tains diamond. The octahedral structure and presence of lamellae 
is often difficult to discern, so that some members of the group 
have been classed as hexahedrites. 



)C 1 AHE])RITES. 



Undet, 



Total 



99-31 

99-719 

99.983 

9Q-3I 

100.00 

99.67 

g8.32 

100.87 

98.34 

98.89 

97.92 

98.74 

100.00 



Sp. Gr. 



7-853 

7-703 



7-74 



7-952 

7-952 

7-783 

7.63 -7.71 

7-73 



Analyst. 

J.E.Whitfield 

H. Moissan 

Booth.Garrett & Blair 

H. N. Stokes 

Mariner & Hoskins. . 

J. L. Smith 

F.A. Genth 

O. Hildebrand 

C. T. Jackson 

C. V. Bonhorst 

A. Duflos 

C. Rammelsberg. . . . 



Reference. 



1902, Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci., W, 85 

1904, Comptes Rendus, CXXXIX, 776 

1905, Proc. Phil. Aca. Sci., LVII, 875 
1895, A. J. S. (3), L, 252-4 

1900, A.J. S. (4), IX, 286 
i860, A.J. S. (2), XXX, 240 
1876, A.J. S. (3), XII, 72-73 

1903, Mitt. f. Neil Vorp. u. Rligen, XXX\',4 
1863, A. J. S. (2), XXXVI, 261 

1863, A.J. S. (2), XXXVI, 261 

1888, Neues Jahrb., 372 

1848, Ann.Phy. Chem., LXXIV, 61-65 

1848. Ann. Phy. Chem., LXXIV, 443-448 



74 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

2. COARSE OCTAHEDRITES. 

Width of lamellce 2.0-1.5 ''•'"''''■ ^lie lamellar or octahedral struc- 



COARSE 



Name. 



Beaconsfield. 
Bendego 



Billings 

Bischtube 

Black Mountain. . 
Bohumilitz 



Canyon City. . 
Cosby Creek. 



Duel! Hill 

Greenbrier County. 

Jennie's Creek 

Lexington County.. 
Magura % 



Niagara 

Oscuro Mountains. 



Fe. 


92 


56 


91 


90 


88 


46 


91 


99 


93 


39 


96 


04 


9i 


06 


9^ 


12 


94 


77 


88 


81 


91 


25 


87 


00 


93 


91 


91 


64 


91 


90 


92 


75 


94 


24 


91 


59 


91 


56 


92 


42 


93 


62 


89 


42 


90 


91 


92 


55 


92 


67 


90 


79 



Ni. 



Co. 



7.34 

5-71 
8.59 



.48 



6 91 

5-17 
7. II 



• 42 
.87 



■23 
.20 

•17 
•17 



.81 
•33 
•51 
•37 
.60 



t8.3i 



•93 



Cu. 



.02 
tr. 
tr. 



Cr. 



.26 



■15 
.05 



.19 
.09 

•37 
.14 
.08 

•'3 
tr. 



.27 



.04 



.06 



C. 

.05 



.07 



50 



■03 



.07 



.08 



.08 
.18 



C!. 



.46 



.01 
1.44 



1. 91 

2.20 



15 



.26 



Miscellaneous. 



P. Fe. Ni. .37 



C. etc 1. 12 



Mn.oQ 



(iraphite .80 1 



Sn. tr. 



C.Cu.Si.Soh. 1. 41 
Co. C. Si., etc., 1. 17 



*Cu. Sn. iSy ditf. 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 75 

ture is more obvious than in tlie coarsest octahedrites, and the nickel- 
cobalt content in some members slightly higher. Cohenite and 
graphite are characteristic and common ingredients. 
)ctahedrites. 


.OSS. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






I 00 . 76 
I 00 . 00 

99-45 
100.09 
100.82 

1 00 . 00 
100.00 

100.00 
100.98 

96.38 

99-37 

100.00 

98.56 

99.68 

99.20 

100.56 

100.07 

99.50 

100.00 

99.69 

99-30 

99-44 

99-30 

100.46 

100.07 

99-36 




0. Sjostrom 


1897, Sitzber. Berl. Akad., 1047 

1863, Buchner, Meteorites, 144 

1867, Phipson, Meteorites, 94 

1905, A. J. S. (4), XIX, 242 

1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, V.A.N.H., XII, 55 

1847, A.J. S. (2), IV, 81-83 


•93 
.96 




7-73 
7-47 


Flickentscher 

Wohler & Martius . . 

H.W. Nichols 

Scherer & Sjostrom. 

C. U. Shepard 

J. Steinman 












7.261 
7-15 






1830, A. J. S. (I), XIX, 384-386 

1833, Ann. Phy. Chem., XXVII, 1 18-132 




J. J. Berzelius 

C. U. Shepard 

J. M. Davison 

G. Troost 






1853, A.J. S. (2), XV, 12 
1885, A.J. S. (3), XXIX, 469 
1904, A J. S. (4), XVII. 383 
1840, A. J. S. (1), XXXV1II,254 
1842, A. J. S. (I), XLIII, 354-357 






7-1 
7.68 






.50 




6.22 
7.26 


C. U. Shepard 

C. A. Toy 






1853, Ann. Chem. Pharm., LXXXVI, 39-43 

1857, Ann. Phy. Chem., C, 254-255 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A.N.H.XV,373 

1876, A.J. S. (3), XII, 439 

1887, Min. Mag., VII, 183 

1886, A.J. S. (3), XXXI, 147 

i88i,A, J. S. (3), XXI, 119 

1847, Ostr. Blatt. f. Lit., No. 169,-670 

Same 






C. Bergmann. 

J. Fahrenhorst 

B. S. Burton 

L. Fletcher 










7.46 




.12 


7-344 

7.00-7.405 

7.814 

7.814 

7.01-7.22 


J. B. Mackintosh .... 
C. U. Shepard, Jr . . . 
A Patera 




















A. Lowe 


1849, Neues Jahrb., 199 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A.N.H.XV,378 

1902, Jour. Geo)., X, 518-519 

1897, Proc. Colorado Sci. Soc. 






J. Fahrenhorst 

J. M. Davison 

R. C. Hills 






7.12 

























76 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


C u 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


c. 


Si. 


a. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneous. 


St. Francois County 


92.10 
92.68 
95-94 
91-57 
91-57 
92.76 
89.99 
91.46 
91.65 
92.67 


2.60 
6.97 
2.66 
8.31 
7.02 
5.69 
10.01 
8.30 
7.88 
6.46 


tr. 
-52 






tr. 
•34 


.01 


tr. 


tr. 






S('lirfiWr>i'e 5 




.02 




-03 


.01 




Sarepta 

Silver Crown 




.02 


? 

Sn.112 I'.Fe.M. 1.32 


tr. 
.62 

-79 
tr. 






.07 
.18 
.86 




tr. 






Smith\iiie 


tr. 










Res.M;iinlyCarli..i5 ; 
P Fe. Ni. 28 


Tabarz 












Wichita 


















Willamette 






















.21 

-55 


tr. 




.09 
.24 














Youndegin 










.04 


Mg 42 1 













3. MEDIUM OCTAHEDRITES. 

Width of lamella; 1.0-0.5 mm. More than one-third of the iron 
meteorites belong to this class. They present, as a rule, quite uni- 
form characters. The lamellar structure is, as a rule, well-defined, and 



Medium 



Xair.e. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Ci. 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneous. 


Abert Iron 


92.92 
92.04 
88.62 
92.64 
90.78 
96.50 
91.36 
92.29 
05.20 

89.75 
91.87 
93-92 


6.07 
7.00 
10.63 
7.10 
8.60 
2.60 
7.56 
8.14 

2-13 
8.90 
6.60 
4-93 


•54 
.68 
.84 


















Sfhri'ibersile . . 56 
Graphite. .03 








.08 

-15 
.16 

.05 


.01 
tr. 


.02 

tr. 
tr. 








Algoma 


.02 
.04 






Angara 








tr. 


Ca.tr. Mg. .06 


Arlington 


1 .02 


tr. 


tr. 




Ashcville 


-50 
tr. 


.20 






Bald Eaole 


.70 






.09 


.06 








Burlington 


























.50 
.70 
■3i 


S. & loss. 2.17 


u 


.62 
tr. 
-39 


tr. 














Mn. tr. 


Cabin Creek 




■ 41 

.08 


.05 


Comb'nd 
■15 


.20 


tr. 




Cachiyuyal 


Ca. Mg.. . .30 















March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



77 



Loss. 



Undet, 



Total. 



99.70 

100.58 

99.96 

99-95 

99-54 

100.38 

I 00 . 00 

99.76 

99-83 
100.38 



Sp. Gr 



Analyst. 



Reference. 



7.746 
7-63 



7. 02-7. 1 1 C. U. Shepard 1869, A. J. S. (2), XLVII, 233 234 

t 
J. Fahrenhorst 1900, Meteoreisen-Studien.XI, A.N.H. XV,3]1 

J. Auerbach !i864, Sitz. Wien Akad., XLIX (2), 497 

H.L. Mclhvain 1888, A. J. S. (3), XXXVI, 277 

O. W. Huntington... 1894, Proc. Am. Acad. Arts & Sci., XXIX, 253 

7.74 W. Fberhard 1855, Ann. Cliem. Pharm., XC\'I, 286-289 

W. P. Riddell i860, Trans. St. Louis Acad, (i), 623 

J. E. Whitfield 1904. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci., lY, 148 

7.7 J.M.Davison jSame 

L. Fletcher 1887. Min. Mag., VIl, 125 



the three alloys — kamacite, taenite, and plessite — are usually pres- 
ent. Among accessory constituents, troilite and schreibersite pre- 
dominate. These are often in the form of nodules of appreciable 
size. 
Octahedrites. 



Loss. 



Undet. 



Total 



100.09 
99.86 
100.26 

I 00 . 00 

100.45 

99.80 

99-77 
100.43 
I 00 . 00 
99 97 
09. 42 
99. S2 



Sp. Gr. 



.'^nahst. 



7.589 



7-75 



6.50-7.50 
7.06 



72 
837 



C. U. Shepard, Jr. . . . 

R-B. Riggs 

A. A. Koch 

M.A.Gobel 

F. F. Sharpless 

C. U. Shepard 

W. G. Owens 

C. H. Rockwell 

C. U. Shepard 

\V. S. Clark 

J.E.Whitfield 

J. Domeyko 



Reference. 



1876, A.J. S. (3), XII, 119 

1887, Bull. U. S. Geul. Sur. VIII, 94 97 

1903, Bull. Geiil. Soc. Amer. XI\', 104 

1874, B«ll. St. Petersburg Akad. XIX, 544-54 
i8g6, Amer. Geol. XVIII, 270 

1839, A. J. 8.(1), XXXVI, 81 84 
i892,A.J.S. (3), XLI II, 423-424 
1844, A.J. S. (I), XLVl, 402 
1847, A.J. S. (2), IV, 77-78 
1852, Metallic Meteorites, 61-62 
1887, A. J.S. (3,, XXXIII, 500 

1875, Comptes Rendus, LXXXI, 597 



78 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Name. 



Caperr 

Cape York 



Carthage 

Casas Grandes . 



Chilkoot 

Chulafinnee 

Cleveland % 

Colfax -■] 



Coopertown . . . 

Costilla 

Dalton 

Denton County 



Descubridora 



Elbogen 



El Capitan . 
Fort Pierre 

Franceville 
Frankfort . 
Glorieta . . . 



Fe. 



Ni. 



9-33 
8.18 

7-94 
1-1 
4.38 
7.26 
7. II 
7-37 
8.79 
10.31 

10.37 
9.12 
7.71 
4.80 
5-43 
7-53 
8.05 



Co. 



9.07 
2.50 

8.75 
8.52 

8.43 
2.47 
8.40 
7.19 
7.61 

8.06 
8.53^ 
9.86 



1.85 
.76 
.61 

1.59 
.60 



Cu. 



tr. 



tr. 



. 12 
.04 
.04 
tr. 



.24 



.05 



tr. 
•03 



Cr. 

tr. 



•03 



tr. 



tr. 



P. 



24 
18 

19 

09 

24 
18 
12 
17 
32 
19 
21 
04 
10 
tr. 



,24 



.05 
.18 



.19 

.01 
.40 



.02 
.04 



.006 
.09 
.08 



High. 
.26 



•45 



•15 
.04 



Si. 



.60 



.02 
.02 



.04 



CI. 



tr. 



•33 



.66 



.05 



Miscellaneous. 



1. 19 



Chromite . .03 



Mn. tr. 



P.Cr. and losn. .05 



Mn. tr. 

P. Fe. Ni. 2.21 
Mg.28, Mn.tr. 



Al. 19, Mn. .%l 

Oa. 35, Mg. .65 



*Pt. tr. 



Zn. .03, Mn.tr. 



*Schreibersite, .84; Graphite, tr.; Silicate, tr. 







Marcp 


[, 19 


07. 


Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 79 


.OSS. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






99-97 

99-38 

100.04 

99-72 

100.02 

lOI . 12 

I 00 . 00 

99.65 

99-496 

99.67 

99-45 

99.10 

100.16 

99.80 

99-78 

99-63 

100.00 

I 00 . 00 

100.00 

98. 10 

100.00 

99.00 

99-94 

99.80 

102.48 

99-31 
100.00 

99.52 
99.42 


7.86 


L. Fletcher 


1899, Min. Mag. XII, 167-170 
1898, Northward Over the Great Ice, (2) 600 
" " 602 






J. K. Phelps 

J. E. Whitfield 

E. Boricky 












7.48-7.50 


1866, Neuesjahrb, 808-810 

1902, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. XXV, 71 

1903, Mitt. Nat. Ver. f. Neuvorp. u. Riigen, 
XXXV, 13 

1905, Label, State Mining Bureau Collection, 

San Francisco, California 
1880, A. J. S. (3), XX, 74 






W. Tassin 






7 
7 

7 


885 
76 

521 


Cohen & Hildebrand 


.05 




J. B. Mackintosh. . . . 

F. A. Genth 

S. W. Cramer 

L. G. Eakins 

J. L, Smith 






1886, Proc. Phila. Acad. Sci. 366-368 






1890, Trans. N. Y. Acad. Sci. IX, 197-198 
1890, A, J. S. (3), XXXIX, 395-396 






7 


85 






1861, A. J, S. (2) XXXI, 266 
1895, Proc. Colo. Sci. See. 
1883, A. J. S. (3), XXVI, 338 
i860, Trans. St. Louis Acad. I, 623 






L. G. Eakins 

C. U. Shepard, Jr... 

W. P.Riddell 

A. Madelung 

P. Murphy 






7 
7 
7 
7 
7 


986 

67 

42 

38 

6on 










1863, Buchner, Meteoriten, 193 

1875, Neues Jahrb, 26 

1887, A.J. S. (3), XXXIII, 235 

181 5, Beit. MineralkOrper, VI, 306-308 

1821, Jour. Chem. Phys. XXXII, 253-261 

1834, Ann. Phys. Chem. XXXIII, 135-137 

1863, Buchner, Meteoriten, 151-152 










J. B. Mackintosh 

M. H. Klaproth 

J. F. John 






7.80-7.83 

7-76 
7.74-7.87 

7-78 










J. J. Berzelius 

A. Wehrle 


.06 




P. A. V. Holger 

H. N. Stokes 

H. A.Prout 






1895, A. J. S. (3), I, 252-254 

i860. Trans. St. Louis Acad. I, 711-712 






7-73 
7-74 
7-87 
7.69 






A. Madelung 

J. M. Davison 

J. L. Smith 


1863, Buchner, Meteoriten, 197 
1902, Proc. Roch. Aca. Sci. IV, 75-78 
1870, A. J, S. (2), XLIX, 331 
1885, Proc. Colo. Sci. Soc. II, 14 















L. G. Eakins 























8o 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Name. 



Glorieta 



Guilford County . 
Hopewell Mounds 

Hopper 

Hraschina 



Ivanpah 

Joel's Iron 

Joe Wright .... 

Juncal 

Kenton County . 

Kokstad 

La Caille 



Lenarto 



Lusttown 

Luis Lopez 

Marsliall County 

Matatiela 

Mazapil 

Merceditas 

Misteca 

Morito 



Fe. 



88.81 
87.93 
92.75 
95.20 

90-54 
96.50 
83.29 
89.78 
94.98 

90.45 
91 .22 
92.03 
91.59 
91 .21 
92.50 
89.63 
85.04 
90.90 
90.15 
90.88 
91.50 
95.76 

91.31 
90.12 
92.20 
91 .26 
92.38 
86.86 
95.01 



Ni. 



Co. 



7.28 .17 

11.15^ 33 

3.15! tr. 

4.64 .40 

7.70; .94 

3.5o; 

II . 84 1 . 26 

[ 

8.88! .67 
4.52 



8.80 



•54 



8.62* 
.62 
.84 

•63 
tr. 



7 


00 


7 


65 


8 


01 


5 


90 


9 


83 


8 


12 


8 


50 


6 


55 


8 


45 


8 


58 


3 


66 


8 


17 


8 


72 


7 


30 


7 


84 


7 


33 


9 


92 


4 


22 



3.59 

.665 

.50 

.67 



tr. 
.16 
•32 
.67 
.65 
.61 
.74 
.51 



Cu. 



.04 



tr. 
.02 



tr. 
■03 



Cr. 



tr. 



tr. 



P. 



.36 



.07 
.13 



.07 
.26 
.16 
.21 
tr. 



.33 
. 10 
.19 

•30 
.oS 
.07 
.08 



•13 



tr. 
tr. 



.48 



.03 



.07 
•55 



. 10 
tr. 



. 12 

.03 



.08 



.04 



.68 



.90 



CI. 



•35 



.05 



•03 



In- 

sol. 



1.23 



•30 
.58 



Miscellaneous. 



FeA + Fe(l. .75 
Mn. tr., Sn. tr. 



)Iii. .64, Mg. .48 
K. .43,Al.i.38 



Insol. &: less. .42 



Ca. 1,K3, Al. .77 
11. .til, M?. .23. 



.Mn .15, Sn .08 



Ca. tr. 



By diff. 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



;s. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






96.38 

99-77 

96.65 

100.48 

99.70 

100.00 

I 00 . 00 

99-33 
99.67 
100.05 
100.00 
99.86 
100.20 
100.17 

99-3° 
100.00 
100.00 
100.067 

99.22 
100.00 
100.38 
100.00 

99-99 
99.26 
100.53 
100.05 
100.51 
99.11 
99.82 


7-1 
7.66 

7.67 


Z. U. Shepard 

f. B. Mackintosh 

Z. U. Shepard 

H.W.Nichols 

F. P. Venable 

\I. H. Klaproth 

P. A. V. Holger 

A. Wehrle 


1885, A. J. S. (3), XXIX, 469 






1885, A.J. S. (3), XXX, 238 






1 841, A. J. S. (I), XL, 369-370 






1902, Field Col. Mus. Pub. Geol. Ser. I, 308 
1890, A.J. S. (3), XL, 163 






7-73-7-80 
1 
7.82 

7. 78 5 

7-65 , 
7.863-7.958 

1 






1807, Beit. Mineralkorper, IV, 99-101 






1830, Beit. u. vor. Ett. Zeit. f. Phvs. u. Math. 






V'll, 2, 129-149 
1852, Clark, Metallic Meteorites, 42-44 






C. U. Shepard 

L. Fletcher 


1880, A.J. S. (3), XIX. 381 382 






1889, Min. Mag. VIII, 264 






J. B. Mackintosh 

A. A. Damour 

J. M. Davison 

Fahrenhorst 

L E Rivot 


1886, A.J. S. (3), XXXI, 462 

1868, Comptes Rendus, LXVI, 569-571 










1892, A. J. S. (3), XLIV, 164 

1900, Ann. S. Afr. Mus. 11, 14 

1854, Ann. Mines (5), VI, 554555 

1872, Comptes Rendus, LXXIV, 1 287-1 289 






7.7876 

7-43 
7.64 

7-79 

7.98 
7-73 










J. Boussingault 

P. A. V. Holger 

A. Wehrle 

W. S. Clark 

A. Wehrle 






1830, Beit, u. Ett. Zeit, f. Phys. u. Math. 

VII, 2, 129-149 
1841, Rammelsberg, Handworterbuch, 42'^ 










1852, Metallic Meteorites, 40 


... 






J. Boussingault 

C. U. Shepard 

Mariner & Hoskins . 
J. L. Smith 


1872, Comptes Rendus, LXXIV, 1 288-1289 

1869, A. J.S. (2), XLVII,234 

1900, A.J. S. (4), IX, 284 

i860, A. J.S. (2), XXX, 240 

1900, Ann. So. Afr. Mus. II, 17 

1887, A. J.S. (3% XXXIII, 225. 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A.N. H. XV 

380 
1857, Pogg. Ann.C. 246 

i87i,A.J.S. (3), II, 335-338 














7 . 8084 






J. Fahrenhorst 

J. B. Mackintosh 

J. Fahrenhorst 

C. Bergeman 

J L Smith 














7.58 
7-84 












- 










- 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



I 



Name. 



Murfreesboro . . . 

Nejed 

Orange River. . . 
Petropawlowsk. . 



Plymouth. , 
Puquios . . , 
Red River 



Rhine Valley 
Roebourne . . 
Rowton 



Ruff's Mountain. 



Sacramento Mts. 

San Angelo 

Schwetz 

Seneca Falls. . . . 
Staunton 



No. I. 

No, 2. 

No. 3. 

No. 7. 
Surprise Springs 

Thunda 

Toluca 



Fe. 



96.00 
91.04 
90.48 
97.29 

93 •57 
.67 
.67 
90.02 
90.91 
88.85 
90.91 
91.05 
91.25 
96.00 
90.95 

91-39 
91.96 
93.18 
92.40 
91.44 
90.29 
88.71 
88.36 
89.01 
89.85 
91 .01 
91.54 
91.38 
90.40 



Ni. 



Co. 



2.40! 



7.40' .66 
8.94 



2.07 
6.98 

8.55 
9.83 
9.67 
8.46 
9.07 
8.33 
9- 
8.58 
3.12 
6.01 
7.86 
7.86 

5-77 
7.60 
7.56 
8.85 
10.16 
10.24 
9.96 
7.56 
7.65 

8.49 
8.62 
5.02 



.66 
•71 



•34 
.06 

8 
•37 



tr. 



52 



tr. 



1.05 



.61 

■ 49 
.40 

■43 

•39 
.60 
.89 
.56 



.04 



Cu. 



.24 
.04 



.04 



Cr. 



tr. 



.02 

.02 

.003 

.003 

.003 

.06 

.07 

.02 



tr. 



tr. 



P. 



1.25 
■17 



.04 
tr. 



tr. 
.07 
.24 
•34 
•36 
•37 
.16 
22 
• 17 



.07 
.09 



■75 



•03 



fr. 
.02 
.01 
.02 
.008 

■03 
.01 
.08 
.02 



.04 



■ 14 
.18 

•17 
.18 
. 12 
.05 
.02 



.11 

.09 
.07 
.06 
.06 
.05 



CL 



tr. 

tr. 
.003 
.002 
.004 



In- 

sol. 



Chladnite .54 
Schreib. . .0 



Graph. 



50 



2^35 



16 P.Fe.Ni.2.9 

• Mn. tr. 



Miscellaneous 



■^t 



Mn. tr. 



Schreib.. . .51 



Mn. tr. 



Mg. tr. 

Mn. ? Sn. ti 

Sn. tr. 



Sn 

Mn. tr. 
Sn.... 
Mn. tr. 
Sn 



Sn 

Mn. tr. 
O 



.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
1-5' 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



83 



Undet. 



I .60 
■59 



Total. 



100.00 

99-79 
100.00 

99-36 
100.55 

99-55 

99-55 

100.00 

99.87 

99-31 
100.00 
100.13 
I 00 . 20 
qg.I2I 

Q9.81 
100.00 

99-77 
100. 10 
100.00 

99-97 
100.175 
99.878 
99-345 

99-95 

99.90 
100.00 
100.81 
100.00 

99.72 



Sp. Gr. 



7.89 

7-3 
7.76 



7-93 

7-54 

7.40-7.82 



7.01-7. 10 



Analyst. 



G. Troost .... 
L. Fletcher. . . 
C. U. Shepard 
Sokolowsky . . 

Iwanow 

J. M.Davison. 
L. G. Eakins . 
C. U. Shepard 



B. Silliman, Jr. & T 

S. Hunt. 
W. S, Chapman . . . . 

Mariner & Hoskins - 

W. Flight 



1-1 



7-77 



7.69 



C. U. Shepard .... 

Boecking 

Mariner & Hoskins 

J.E.Whitfield 

C. Rammelsberg. . . 
C. U. Shepard .... 

J. P. Santos 

J. W. Mallet 



7-85 
7.86 
7.84 

7-7308 



Reference. 



7.72 



J.E.Whitfield. 

E. Cohen 

J. Fahrenhorst 

Berthier 

E.Uricoechea . 



848, A. J. S. (2), V, 351-352 

887, Min. Mag. VH, 179-182 

856, A.J. S. (2), XXI, 213 

841, Arch. Kunde Russ. I, 317 

841, Arch. Kunde Russ. I, 723-725 

895, A. J. S. (3), XLIX, 53-55 

890, A. J. S. (3). XL, 226 

829, A. J. S. (I), XVI, 217-219 

846, A. J. S. (2), H, 372-374 

900, Ann. Rep. So.Aust. Sch. Mines, 227-228 

898, A. J. S. (4), V, 136 

882, Phil. Trans. 894-896 

850, Proc. A. A. A. S. HI, 152 154 
856, Neues Jahrbuch, 51 

898, A. J. S. (4), V, 272 
897, A. J. S. (4), ni,66 

851, Ann. Phys. Chem. LXXXIV, 153-154 
853, A. J. S. (2), XV, 366 

878, A.J. S.r 3), XV, 337-338 
887, A. J. S. (3', XXXHI, 59 
871.A.J. S. (3), H, 13 



1903, A. J. S. (4), XV, 469-471 

1900, Mitt. Nat. Ver. f. Neu Vorp. u. Riigen, 

32 
1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H. XV', 

382 

1853, A.J. S. (3), XV, 20 

1854, Jour. Prakt. Chem. LXIII, 317-318 



84 Field 


Columbian Museum 


— Geology 


Vol. Ill 






f 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu'. 


Cr. 


p. s. 


c. 


Si. 


CL 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneo'4 


Toluca 


90 •^7 


7-79 
8.49 
8.86 
9.06 
8.90 
7.10 
7.62 
9.80 

7 2Q 
















I. 91 


ti." 




90 
87 

fc7 
88 
90 
90 
87 
89 
90 

91 

go 

91 
95 
91 
89 

91 
91 
91 
93 


72 
88 

89 
29 
08 

43 
09 

07 
13 
89 
56 
18 
18 

03 
22 

33 
17 
02 
61 


■44 

.89 

1.07 

1 .04 


.... 




.18 

.86 






•25 
















Graph. . i ' 
*C. Graph. 




tr. 




.62 

.78 






























1.24 

■03 
■79 
■85 














.72 

■77 
08 


.01 
tr. 




•15 










+Cu.&Sn. 1 










.02 
.04 

T1 


Schreib... 

Mn. tr. 
Fe. S. tr. ■ 
















7.24 




■38 
















Mn.tr. 




6.32 T.C8 




(Los Reyes) 


7.71 

7-93 
3-38 
7.20 
10.79 
8.83 
8.54 
731 
6.01 


1.07 
•39 
.14 

■53 
tr. 

■ 49 
.06 

.70 
■73 


.14 
tr. 

tr. 




.24 .0^ 


.01 


.01 






Mn. tr. 


Tonganoxie 

Toubil 


. 10 
.05 
■ 14 
.69 






.12 


.08 


.04 


■45 


.)l:i. .09 As. 1 
.)!?. .03 Ca. [ 


Trent<m 














\'ictoria 


















Welland 








.07 












Werchne Udinsk. . 
Wooster 


■13 

tr. 




.07 
■13 


•03 








Mg 

Fe. Ni. P. 

Mn. tr. 









*P. Fe. Ni.. .34; Mn., .20; 
tGraph., etc., .34: P., Fe. 



Sn., tr. 
Ni., .56. 





March, 1907. 


Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 85 


.Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 


3 


100.07 
100.46 

98.73 
99.40 
09.00 
98.42 
99.88 
99.21 
99.20 
100.00 

99-79 

99.85 

99.60 

99-34 

99.35 

100.70 

100.65 

99.84 

99.41 

100.48 




W.J.Taylor 

E.Pugh 


1856, Proc. Phil. Aca. Sci. VIII, 3 
i856,A.J.S. (2), XXII, 374-376 
1856, Ann. Chem. u. Pharm. XCVIII, 383-386 












,, 


11 (1 U II 




,, 


II II II II 




,, 


II II II (1 




Boecking 


Neues Jahrbuch, 304 
(( II 




« 




H. B. Nason 

C. H. L. v.Babo .... 

H.W. Nichols 

E. H.S.Bailey 

J. Antipoff 


1857, Jour. Prakt. Chem. LXXI, 123 

1863, Buchner, Meteoriten, 141 

1902, Pub. Field Col. Mus., Geol. Ser, I 308 

1891, A. J. S. (3),XLII, 386 

1898, Bull. St. Petersburg Acad. Sci, V, 9, 91- 

103 
1869, A.J. S. (2), XLVII, 271 

I869, -Ann. Rep. Smith. Inst. 417-419 

1887, Proc. and Trans. Roy. See. Can., IV. 97 

1890, Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci. I, 87 

1895, Zeit. Kryst. XXIV, 494 

1864, A. J. S. (2), XXXVIII, 385-386 




7-45 


7.82 

7-33 
7.78 
7.87 


J. L. Smith 


G. Bode 


A. P. Coleman 

J. M. Davison 

H. Laspeyres 

J. L. Smith 


7.90 





86 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



4. FINE OCTAHEDRITES. 

Width of lamelliTe 0.4-0.2 mm. The nickel-cobalt content ranges 
between 8 and 10^ per cent. The fields are usuallj' equal in amount 
to the lamellae and contain minute shining flakes, probably of taenite. 

a. Prambanj" 



iOlf 



Name. 



Augustinowka . . 
Bella Roca 



Bethany (Siikerop) 



(Lion River) 



Boogaldi . . . 
Bridgewater 
Buckeberg . . 



Cambria 



Charlotte . . . 
Chupaderos . 

Cuernavaca , 



Grand Rapids. 
It 

Hassi Jekna. . . 
Jamestown . . . . 



Fe. 



Ni. 



91. ql 

91.48 

89.68 

91.07 

92.29 

90.96 

91-37 

93-30 

92.06 

91.13 

88.90 

90.95 

92.45 

94.88 

92.58 

89.06 

91.15 

90.23 

88.78 

88.98 

89.70 

94-54 
88.71 

91-32 
90.24 



7.70 
7.92 
9-78 
8.18 

8.19 

7-97 
6.70 

7-79 
8.05 

9-94 
8.01 

7-55 
5.69 

5-71 
10.65 

8.01 

8.76 

9.80 
10.30 

8.76 



Co. 



10.69 
5.88 
9-75 



Cu. 



.08 

-72 

I. 21 

.81 



I. 19 
.40 



.81 



.02 
-03 



.04 

.02 



-03 
.28 

■35 



Cr. 



tr. 

.02 



.04 



.21 

-31 

.06 
.06 
.18 

-03 

tr. 
.05 



.21 
-05 
.04 



tr. 
.02 
tr. 
. 10 



tr. 

.04 

.06 



.05 



.07 

tr. 

tr. 



tr. 



.64 
. 12 



tr. 
■ 13 



.26 



.05 



C. 



.06 



.02 
.05 



-17 



-13 



.03 
tr. 



.06 



CI. 



In- 
sol. 



.04 



1 .40 



Miscellaneou 



Cu.C.Cr. (l.S. r 



K...0 tr. Sn. 



As. tr. 



1 .04 



Mg 

Graph. . 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrixgton. 



87 





Cohen 


divides the fine octahedrites into two groups, the Prambanan 


group 


and the Rodeo group. The Prambanan group includes the 


greater number. 


They have a fairly uniform composition. Acces- 


sory constituents 


are usually present, but not in large quantity. 


OUP. 






s. Undet. 


'J\..tal. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


References. 




99.86 
100.10 




W. F. Aiexejew .... 


1893, Verb. Russ. Min. Ges. H, 30, 470 
1889, A. J. S. f3), XXXVU, 440 






J.E.Whitfield 




100.39 


7.8244 


Knauer 


1905, Meteoritenkunde, HI, 377 




100.04 


7.8408 


J. Fahrenhorst 


1900, Ann. S. Afr. Mus. n,28 





100.79 


7 . 8408 









99.89 




0. Hildebrand 


1902, Jb. d. Ver. f. Vaterl. Naturk. Wurtem- 




100.00 


7-783 


Krupp Lab 


berg, LVni, 292-306 
1902, Jb. d. Ver. f. Vaterl. Naturk. Wiirtem- 




I 00. 00 


7-45 


C. U. Shepard 


berg, LVni, 292-306 
1853, A. J. S. (2), XV, 1-4 




100.73 
99-98 




Sjostrom & Fahren- 
horst. 
A. Liversidge 


r897, Meteoreisen-Studien, V, A. N. H. XH, 

43 
1902, Jour. Roy. Soc. N. S. W. XXXVI, 341- 




7.85 




99-97 


6.617 


F. P. Venable 


1890, A. J. S. (3), XL, 312-313 




99.60 


7.12 


Wohler & Wicke... 


1863, Gottingen Nach. 364-367 




loi .01 




J. Fahrenhorst 


1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XL A. N. H. XV, 

367 
1845, A. J. S. (I), XLVHI, 388-392 




100.57 


7.52 


D.Olmsted, Jr 




99.69 




B. Silliman, Jr., & T. 
S. Hunt. 


i846,A.J.S. (2), n, 374-376 






I 00 . 00 




C. Rammelsberg 


1870, Ber. Berl. Akad, 444 
i87f.A.J. S. (3), X, 351 




99-94 


7-717 


1. L. Smith 


tr. 


100.20 
99.67 
99.28 




Cohen &Weinschenk 
0. Burger 


1891, Meteoreisen-Studien, VI, A. N. H. VI, 

147-148 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 354 

iqo2, Proc. Roch. Aca. Sci. IV, 79-88 






7-725 


J. E. Whitfield 




100.15 


7.748 


0. Hildebrand 


1902, Mitt. d. Nat. Ver. f. Neu. Vorp. u. 
Riigen, XXXIV, 2 




98.88 
99.91 




F.W.Taylor 

R.B. Riggs 


1884, A. J. S. (3), XXVIII, 300 

1885, A.J. S. (3), XXX, 3'2 




7.87 




99.05 
I 00 . 04 


7.67 


S. Meunier 


1892, Comptes Rendus, CXV, 531-533 
1890, Proc. Am. Acad. (2), XVII, 229-232 







(). W. Huntincrton . 

















88 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



Name. 



Jewel Hill 
Lagrange. 



Mantos Blancos. 

Moonbi 

Prambanan 



Putnam Cuuntv . . . 



Russei Gulch 



St. Genevieve. . . 
Smith's Mountain. 



Thurlow . . 

\'aras 

Yanhuitlan 



Fe. 



QI . 12 
QI .21 

91.92 
90.77 

91-35 
96.71 

94-36 
88.60 
90.03 

94-38 
89.52 
90.28 
go. 61 
90.65 
91.58 
90.68 
90.88 
89.17 
91.28 
96.58 
91.87 



Ni. 



Co. 



•43 
•25 
.62 

•55 
.56 



-97 



tr. 

-79 
.78 
.01 
.29 



9.07 



8.02 
9.92 
8.00 
1.83 
7-36 



.50 

1.04 

-44 



.65 



Cu. 



tr. 

tr. 

.01 

tr. 

tr. 



-07 
tr. 



. II 

-03 



Cr. 



tr. 



•17 



.05 

•03 
.10 
.22 



.20 
.16 
•53 



. II 

.02 



.20 
.14 
•03 
•25 
.05 



.09 



.07 



.004 



•25 



tr. 



.05 



.04 



.02 



CI. 



In- 
soL 



Miscelisneou:t'- 



Sn. tr. 



MgO. tr. 



Sn. P. S. Mi 
Ca I A 



lusol.Si.Sfh.Cr. 
Sn. .02 



Cu. & Cr., 



CaO. 

Al,03 







March, 1907. 


Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 89 




ss. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


.Analyst. 


Reference. 






99-4.'5 
99-32 
100.23 
100.25 
100.13 
99-57 
99-73 
100.004 
loo. 55 
99.61 
100.00 
99-56 
99.25 
99.50 
100.07 
100.00 
99.46 
100.43 
99-77 
100.00 
100.02 


7.89 


J. L. Smith 


i860, A.J. S (2), XXX, 240 

1861, A. J. S. (2), XXXI, 265-266 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 358 

1889, Min. Mag. VIII, 258 

1893, Jour. Roy. Soc. N. S. W. XXVII, 82 

1866, Archives Neerl. I, 468 

1867, Nat. Tij. Ned. Ind., XXIX, 268-270 

1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, A. N. H. XII, 
62 

1904, Javabode, July 12, 5 

i854,A.J.S. (2), XVII, 331-332 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 345 

1866, A. J. S. (2), XLII, 218-219 

1867, A. J. S. (2), XLIII, 281 

1901, Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci. IV, 65-66 
i877,A.J. S. (3), XIII, 214 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 379 
1889, Min. Mag. VIII, 259 
1876, Proc. Phila. Acad. Sci., 126 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 320 








J, L. Smith 








0. BiJrger 








7.904 
7.83 
7-48 
7.83 


L. Fletclier 








J. C. H. Mingaye . . . 
.11. Van dcr Boom .flescli . . . 
E. H. von Baumhauer 

Vlaanderen 

0. Sjostrom 

De Tone 


-83 


























12- 














7.69 


C. U. Shepard 

Knauer & Burger. . . 
J. L. Smith 














7.72 
7-692 

7-78 








C. T. Jackson 

J. E. Whitfield 

F. A. Genth 

J. L. Smith 

0. Burger 
































7.863 
7-827 


L. Fletcher 




i6 





L. R.DeLoza 

0. Burger 





























9° 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

b. Rodeo Group 

The nickel-cobalt content is somewhat higher than in the Pram- 



RODl 



Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


C. 


Si. 


CL 


In- 
sol. 


Miscellaneouj;; 


Alt-Biela 


85-34 
83-89 
87.97 

86.95 
89.84 


12.89 
14.06 

10.75 
11.27 

8.70 


.41 

-83 

1.07 

1.20 

.28 






-39 
.21 
.19 

-25 
.80 


.06 


.02 






.86 




Bear Creek 


tr. 

.04 

.01 

.07 


-03 








Quesa 


tr. 
.01 

.02 












Rodeo 








.07 






.09 


















5. FINEST OCTAHEDRITES. 

Width of lamellae not exceeding 0.2 mm. The nickel-cobalt 
content lies, as a rule, between 10 and 15 per cent. Plessite strongly 
developed. Cohen divides the class into two groups, the Salt River 
group and the Tazewell group. 

Salt Rivi 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 
soL 


Miscellaneou „ 




88.94 
89-54 
89-34 
89.91 
89.12 
90.74 
90.89 


6 98 ^i 






-15 
.12 
.48 
.50 
.12 


.005 
.02 

-03 
tr. 


.01 

.02 
tr. 


tr. 










9.40 

9.87 

8.85 

10.02 

9-36 
8 70 


.98 
.60 

-74 
.26 


.02 
.06 

tr. 
.01 


.02 


.02 




Chromite, . 


(1 


tr. 








Butler 2/, 








Salt River 


tr. 
tr. 








.26 


Mg. Na., tr. 




8c 


.04 




-34 


.02 










































J 



' 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



91 



banan group, so that the group is a transition to the finest octahe- 
drites. 



Iss. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






99-97 


7-525 


M. Neff & A. Stocky 


1899, Prog.d.Bohm Gym. in Mahr-Ostrow 






98.99 




J. L. Smith 


1867, A.J. S. (2), XLIII, 280 






100.02 

99-79 
99-89 




J. Fahrenhorst 

0. Burger 


1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H. XV, 

379 
1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 299 

1905, Field Col. Mus. Geol. Sen III, 4 










H.W.Nichols 





a. Salt River Group. 
The content of nickel-cobalt is lower than in the Tazewell group, 
not exceeding 10^ per cent. Plessite predominates as compared with 
the Tazewell group. Schreibersite is common in numerous small, 
elongated individuals. 



iOUP. 



ss. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






96.285 
100.14 
100.40 
100.00 

99-53 
100.36 
100.84 


7.69 

7-59 
7.8432 
7-8 
7.72 


J. E. Whitfield 

Cohen & Hildebrand 

0. Sjostrom 

Mariner & Hoskins. 
J. L. Smith 


1902, Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci. IV, 74 

1903, Mitt. N. Ver. f. Neu Vorp. u. 
XXXV, 13 

1898, Ber. Berlin Akad., ig-22 

1898, A. J. S. (4), V, 137 

i877,A.J. S. (3),XIII,2i3 

1851, Proc. A. A. A. Sci. IV, 36-38 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, X, A. N. 
76 








Riigen, 






















W. H. Brewer 

J. Fahrenhorst 








7.6648 


H. XV, 









92 Field Coi 
This group incl 


lumbian Museum — Geology 

^. Tazewell Group. 
udes the octahedrites having 


, Vol. hi. 1 

the highest percent- ■ 
Tazkwei;^ 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


c. 


Si. 


^'- 1 sol. 


Miscellaneoui* 


Carlton 


86.54 

85-33 
8g.68 
90.31 
87. q6 
88.60 
82.70 


12.77 

13-34 
9.20 
8.23 

10.99 

9-74 
14.82 


-63 
-87 
-33 
1.36 
.88 

•47 
.46 


02 - 


.16 
.16 
.16 

.09 
-17 

-43 
.18 


■03 

tr. 

.02 

tr. 

.21 

tr. 


. II 

tr. 




1 


^ 


Laurens County. . . 
Mart 












, 


.04 

.08 
.01 


tr. 
-03 










Mungindi 


.01 


tr. 
















Xarraburni Creek V^ 








■ 72 


Resinous matter ' 
)k.i) .24, SiO., 


Tazewell -'■' 


.07 .... 

i 


.08 






.02 








C-. CcwRA AND Victoria West. 
Cowra and Victoria West resemble the Salt River group in their 
predominance of plessite. Their place among the octahedrites is not 

Cowra a> _ 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co, 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


c. 


Si, 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneou 


Cowra -'''■' 


85.26 
88.83 


13-23 
10. 14 


I .02 
0.53 


.02 

tr. 




.22 
.28 


.01 


.0'? 


ni 






Sn.and Mn., 


Victoria West .... 


















— 


B. HAMMOND OCTAHEDRITES. 

These meteorites appear in section to be granular aggregates in a 
which black particles and taenite-like lamella extend in directions ' 
parallel to octahedral planes. They thus have resemblances to the 
octahedrites and form a transition to the ataxites. The structure by 

original, the structure has been produced by the separation of the 
nickel-rich alloy and black particles to form a web, the lines of which 

Hammo> ;^ 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 

.09 


Miscellaneot '' 


Cacaria 


87.38 
g2.oo 
89.78 
91 .62 
89-39 


12.06 

7.70 
7.65 
7-34 
8.18 


.65 

•54 

1.32 

1. 01 


.02 

•03 

tr. 

.04 


.01 
.01 

.01 


.22 
.24 

-51 
•52 


.05 

.06 

.01 








SiO., ... . 










Hammond 


tr. 
.06 








Sn. tr. SiOa. 






.01 




Reed City 





















































March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



93 



age of nickel-cobalt. It reaches 15 per cent, and more. Taenite is 
strongly developed. 



lOUP. 



Undet. 



Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


100.26 


7-95 


99.70 . 




99-43 • 




100.00 


7-4 


100.32 . 




99.98 


7-57 


99.22 


7.89 



Analyst. 

L. G. Eakins 

J. B. Mackintosh . . . 

H. N. Stokes 

Mariner & Hoskins 

R. Knauer 

A. Liversidge 

J. L. Smith 



Reference. 



1890, A. J. S, (3), XL, 223-224 

1886, A. J. S. (3), XXXI, 463-465 

1900, Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci. II, 53 

i898,A.J. S. (4),V, 139 

1905, Meteoritenkunde, III, 269 

1903, Proc. Roy. Soc. N. S. W. XXXVII, 

240 
1855, A. J. S. (2), XIX, 153 



certain, however, and it seems desirable therefore to group them sep- 
arately. Their percentage of nickel-cobalt resembles that of the 
finest octahedrites, 11 to 15 per cent. 
CTORiA West. 



is. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr, 


-Analyst. 


Reference. 






99.80 
99.78 


7.805 
7.692 


J. C. H. Mingaye . . . 
J. L. Smith 


1904, Rec. Geo!. Sur. N. S. W., VII, 31 
1873, A. J. S. (3), V. 108 











accord with octahedral planes. In the meshes of this web the 
nickel-poor remainder is deposited as a homogeneous, granular 
aggregate. If the structure is secondary, it may be explained by 
supposing that a normal octahedrite was somewhat softened by heat, 
so as to destroy the lamellar structure in part, after which solidifi- 
cation took place. If this latter be the correct explanation, the 
softening was carried farther in Hammond than in Cacaria and Reed 
City. 

TAHEDRITES. 



;s. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


.Analyst. 


Reference. 






100.64 
100.58 

99.82 
100.62 

97.57 


7.7070 


J. Fahrenhorst 

Fisher i Allnieudinger .... 

J. Fahrenhorst 

J. E. Whitfield 


1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H., XV, 

362-363 
Same 











7.601-7.703 
7.288-7.506 
7.6 


1887, A. J. S. (3), XXXIV, 383 






1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H., XV, 






356 
1903, Jour. Geol., XI, 233 









94 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

C. BRECCIATED OCTAHEDRITES. 

In these, as in the brecciated hexahedrites, the mass appears 


to be al 
BrecciateiP 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


c. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 
sol. 


Miscellaneous * 


Barranca Blanca.. 


91.50 
89.28 
91.99 
91.46 
92.30 

93-50 
96.40 
89.84 
90.91 
91.30 
92.09 


8.01 
9.26 
7-15 
7-72 
6.52 
2.50 
2.63 
5.96 
5.65 
5.82 
5.98 


.65 
,60 
tr. 


tr. 
• 04 


.11 


•15 

.05 


• 13 

•77 








•03 
.24 


J 


N'Goureyma 


.04 






Ce cl 

Chromite .elf 

Fe.S c!'. 

Graphite, etf. .. 






Santa Rosa .... ^3 
















.28 




.78 


.02 


tr. 


•36 


.04 


.18 








Tula 








Sn.tr. ,... 

Schreibersite. . . 
Sn. .07 Sfh, . .. 






















Zacatecas 


.62 
.42 
.41 
.91 


tr. 






•13 

.07 








3.08 

2.17 

2.19 

.04 


Mg. tr. 






•23 

•25 

1.02 




.50 




.. 


tr. 


■74 


Mg., tr. 


„ 








































- 






■ 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



95 



made up of numerous individuals, the direction of whose lamellae dif- 
fers in the individual grains. 

ICTAHEDRITES. 



ass. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






100.47 

100.49 
99-36 
99.46 

100.20 
96.90 

100.00 
99-63 
99-95 
99-97 

100.78 


7.823 
7.6722 

7-31 
7.30-7.60 
7.6896 
7-332 


L. Fletcher 

E. Cohen 


1889, Min. Mag., VIII, 263 






1901, Mitt. Nat. Ver. f. Neu. Vorp. u. Rligen, 


1 




S. Meunier 


XXXIII, 14 
1901, Compt. Rendus, CXXXII, 444 






Rivero and Boussinpiult . . . 

0, Sjostrom 

W. Haidinger 

J. Auerbach 

H. Miiller 


1824, Ann. Phys. Chem., XXV, 438-443 






1899, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 






XIV, 138 
1861, A. J. S. (2), XXXII, 144 






1863, Neues Jahrb., 362 

i860, Jour. f. prakt. Chemie, LXXIX, 25 

a It It tt 






7.20 

7-625 

7.50 






(1 






J; 


(1 U 1< il 






E. Cohen 


1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, V, A. N. H., XII, 
51 











96 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



III. ATAXITES. 

These iron meteorites are characterized by a fine granular to 
compact structure throughout. They show no evidence of the cubic 
cleavage and Neumann lines which characterize the hexahedrites, nor 
of the lamellar structure, octahedrally arranged, of the octahedrites. 
The individual grains are in some cases visible to the naked eye, but 
for the most part are of microscopic or sub-microscopic dimensions. 
In some occur peculiar streaks which seem to have crystallographic 
arrangement, but their exact relations have not been determined. 
These form a special group, which, while not ataxites in the strict- 
est sense of the term, may be included among them for present pur- 
poses. The ataxites show the greatest variation among all iron 
meteorite*, in their nickel-cobalt content. This varies from 6 to i6per 
cent, and in the doubtful Oktibbeha to 6^ per cent. Two general 



f 






Si RATH K 



Name. 



Campo del Cielo . 
(Wohler's Iron.) 



Cincinnati 

Locust Grove 

San Fraiinsco del Mezqiiita 

Siratik (Senegal). . 



Fe. 



92-33 
89 22 
94.25 
94-47 
94-30 
93-38 
93-36 
94.07 



Ni. 



Co. 



7.38 
9.51 



-57 
.68 
-64 
•39 

-87 
■77 



Cu. Cr. 



•03 
.01 

tr. 



-03 
.01 



-03 



.20 
.18 
.05 
.18 

-23 
.16 
.26 



.05 
.05 
.05 



-15 

.04 



CI. 



Miscellaneous.' ^ 



P. Fe. Ni. .4 

Sn c 

Scbreibersite. .c 
C. etc 2 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



97 



subdivisions may be made of the ataxites, according as they are nickel- 
poor or nickel-rich. Transitions occur between these, but a general 
grouping is practicable. Accessory constituents are not usually abun- 
dant in the ataxites, and when occurring are of small dimensions as a 
rule. 

A. NICKEL-POOR ATAXITES. 

The nickel-cobalt content lies between 6 and 7 per cent, the com- 
position thus corresponding to that of kamacite. The structure is, 
as a rule, plainly granular, seldom compact, the size of the grains 
reaching 0.75 mm. 

1. SIRATIK GROUP. 

An etched surface appears rough through the presence of irregu- 
larly arranged depressions, due perhaps to the solution of some acces- 
sory constituent, such as troilite or schreibersite. The smaller the 
depressions the more plainly the boundaries of the grains appear. 
The latter range from 0.33 to 0.75 mm. in dimension. 



:OUP 



ss. 


Unde . 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






100. 16 

99.23 
100.28 
100.69 
100.77 

99-89 
100.03 
100.37 


7-547 

7.85 

7.7679 

7.6895 

7.7083 

7.83 

7.7687 

7.7752 


N. S. Manross 

C. Martius 


1853, A.J. S. (2), XV, 22 

Ann. Chem. u. Pharm., CXV, 92 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 

XIII, 124 
1898, Ber. Berlin Akad., 428-430 

1897, Ber. Berlin Akad., 76-81 

1868, Comptes Rendus, LXVI, 573-574 
1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H., XV, 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 
XIII, 131 










0. Sjostrom 

A. A. Damour 

J. Fahrenhorst 

0. Sjostrom 



























98 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

2. NEDAGOLLA GROUP. 

Both granular and compact irons occur in this- group. They lac 
the rough appearance of the Siratik group on etched surfaces. Th 


e 

NeDAGOLL; t 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneq 


Chesterville 


95.00 

93-15 
93.80 
94.90 

94-03 
94.18 
92.61 
94.50 
93.04 

94-33 
94.72 
90.76 

92-35 
92.81 


5.00 
5.82 
5.50 
4.18 

5-55 
5.56 
6.20 

5.31 

6.16 

5.48 

4.72 

7.87 

6.71 

6.70 
t 






tr. 


tr. 
■34 
•34 

tr. 

-23 
.19 

.02 
















•73 
.75 

-33 
-53 
.60 

-49 
















<( 


.02 


tr. 


-03 

. 22 

-03 
-05 

-05 


.02 








- 


Forsyth County . . . 

(Compact portion.) . 

(Granular portion). 
Nedagolla 










.02 

.02 

tr. 




.02 
.04 


.25 


tr. 
.17 














Nenntmansdorf . . . 








« 








.22 
.29 
.18 














„ 


■71 
■71 


















Primitiva 


tr. 




.02 


■03 










Rasgata 








IB 


K 


•25 
.64 


tr. 
01 


tr 


-35 
.28 


tr. 
.08 










P. Fe. Ni. .: ■ 
Silicates . .c 
Sn t 


„ 


.19 










i 








■ 


























, - 



3. RAFRUTI GROUP. 
The members of this group resemble the granular members of the 



1 



RAFRU-i 



Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


hi- 

sol. 


=i 

Miscellaneous! 


Illinois Gulch 


92.51 

86.77 
89.87 


6.70 

12.67 

9-54 


.16 
.81 
.61 


.02 
■03 


.01 
.01 


.62 
.08 
.06 


tr. 
. II 


.01 


tr. 






' 


" S'o 






. 


Rafriiti . . 


.18 












































-1 
-■■1 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



99 



size of the grains in the granular members is generally less than 0.5 
mm., rarely 0.75 mm. No granular structure is visible, even on strong 
magnification, in the compact members. Chesterville and Rasgata are 
rich in rhabdite. 



[:S, 



L'ndet. 



Total. 



100.00 
100.04 
100.46 

99-63 

100.41 

100.81 

99.62 

99.81 

99.42 

100.81 

100.38 

98.63 

100. II 

100.71 



Sp. Gr. 



7 


82 


7 


8209 


7 


4954 


7 


3357 


7 


8613 


6 


21 


7 


8241 


7 


6 



7-33-7-77 
7-654 



.'\nalyst. 

C. U. Shepard 

O. Sjostrom 

E. A. de Schweinitz 
O. Sjostrom 

G. E. Lichtenberger 

E. Geinitz 

E.Cohen 

O. Sjostrom 

Rivero and Boussiiigault . . . . 

F.Wohler 

O. Sjostrom 



Reference 



1849, A. J. S. (2), VII, 449 

1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, V, A. N. H., XII, 

47 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 
XIV, 150 

1896, A. J. S. (4), I, 208-209 

1897, Ber. Berlin Akad., 386-396 



1897. Meteoreisen-Studien, VI, A. N. H., XII, m 
1873, Sitz. Isis. p. 4, Dresden 
1876, Neues Jahrb., 609 

1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, V, A. N. H., XII, 

42 
1897, Meteoreisen-Studien, VI, A. N. H., XII, 

123 
1824, Ann. Chem. Phys., XXV, 442-443 

1852, Ann. Chem. Pharm., LXXXII, 243-248 

1808, Meteoreisen-Studien, Vlll, A. .\. H., XIII, H3 



^OUP. 



Nedagolla group, but have an essentially higher nickel-cobalt content, 
and thus form a transition to the nickel-rich ataxites. 



'SS. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. (^.r. 


.Analyst. 


Reference. 






100.00 
100.36 
100.41 


7-7 

7-8329 
7.596 


Mariner and Hoskins 

J.Fahrenhorst 

Cohen and Hildebrand 


1900, A. J. S. (4), IX, 201-202 

1900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H., XV, 

353 
1902, Mitt. Nat. Ver. f. Neu. \'(>rp. u. Rligen, 
XXXIV, 87 
























• 



loo Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

B. NICKEL-RICH ATAXITES. 

These ataxites are fine-grained to compact, and acquire, as a rule, 
on weak etching, a characteristic varnish-like luster. Stronger etch- 
ing produces a dull surface, having a peculiar velvety sheen. The 

Smithlan 




Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


Ci. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneous 


% 


Babb's Mill 


85.30 
87.16 
80.59 
81.54 
81.45 
91.42 
86.30 
88.23 
88.41 
85.88 
87.01 
85.99 
86.20 
84.56 

83.13 
79.67 
82.83 
80.78 


14.70 

9.76 

17.10 

17.74 
17.30 

7.95 
12.58 
II .01 
1 1 09 




















Al. Mg.Ca.,t 




(Troost Iron) 






















,1 


2.04 
1.26 
1.67 












tr. 




. 12 


Mn t 

P. Fe. Ni. .] 

P. Fe. Ni. .c 




<t 






.11 
. 12 








.. 


•03 


■03 


.01 


.07 










(.Blake Iron) 














1.66 

•72 


















ij 




.. 




.02 
.02 


tr. 
tr. 


tr. 
tr. 


•03 
.03 




.01 
.02 




1 








1 






18.23 








Deep Springs 






.04 

.06 






•53 


•39 

.02 








13 
14 
14 
16 
18 
16 

17 


44 
20 

95 
32 
77 
42 


.70 


•03 


•03 




.02 


















■33 
.76 
1.18 
.94 
.84 






tr. 

•23 
.18 
.09 
. 12 


.12 
.02 

.27 
• 17 
•15 


tr. 
. 11 












ti 


.02 
.06 


.06 
.06 












Morradal 

Smithland 






























•15 


















































■i 


^ 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. ioi 

nickel-cobalt content lies, for the most part, between 14 and 20 per 
cent, though it drops to 12 and rises to 263^^ per cent. 

1. SMITHLAND GROUP. 

The nickel-cobalt content does not exceed 20 per cent. 



Total. 



100.00 
96.92 
99.85 

100.70 

100.68 

99-37 
100.54 
100.02 
100.23 
104. II 
100.45 
100.29 
100.40 

99-96 
100. 59 
100. 19 
100.51 

99.96 



Sp.Gr. 



7.548 



7.839 
7.7948 



7.858 



8.186 
7-4538 

7 . 8892 

7.4727 
7-8543 
7.7115 
7. 12 



Anahst. 



C. U. Shepard . . 

G. Troost 

W. S. Clark.... 

E, Cohen 

J. Fahrenhorst . 
W. P. Blake.... 
Cohen and Weiiisclu'iik. 
J. Fahrenhorst . 



O. Sjostrom. . . 
F. P. Venable. 
J. Fahrenhorst 
J. Domeyko . . . 
J. E. Whhfield 
O. Sjostrom . . . 



Lindner. 



Reference. 



847, A. J. S. (2) IV, 76-77 

845,A.J.S. (I), XLIX, 342-344* 

852, Metallic Meteorites, 65-66 

892, Meteoreisen-Studien, II, A. N. H., VII, 

147, 148 
900, Meteoreisen-Studien, X, A. N. H., XV, 

93 
886, A. J. S. (3), XXXI, 44 

891, Meteoreisen-Studien, I, A. N. H., VI. 

142-143 
900, Meteoreison-Studien, X, A. N. H., XV, 

93 
Same 

898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VII, A. N. H., 

XIII, 49 
890, A. J. S. (3), XL, 162 

900, Meteoreisen-Studien, XI, A. N. H., XV, 

355 
879, Mineralojia, Santiago 

888, A. J. S. (3), XXXVI, 276 

898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 

XIII, 147 
898, Videnskabsselskabets Skrifter (i), VII, 

II 
898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VII, A. N. H., 

XIII, 47 
1904, Sitzb. K. Frcus. Atad. der Wis-. XXXII 



*As recalculated by Cohen, Meteoritenkunde. Heft HI, p. 104. 



I02 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. Ill 

2. CRISTOBAL GROUP. 

The nickel-cobalt content exceeds 20 per cent. 






Cristob.? '" 


Xame. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 


Miscellaneouf * 


Limestone Creek.. 


65.18 
66.56 

83-57 
65.03 
73-72 


27.71 
24.71 
12.67 

29-99 
25.60 






















K (I 










4.0 






1.48 

.QI 




Cr.&Mn. 3 


« 11 














FeS.. ....2.:|' 


(t II 


1.48 
1 .0 






.19 
.18 








San Cristobal 






























._ 



3. OKTIBBEHA. 
The meteoric origin of Oktibbeha is doubtful, on account of its 



OktibbeHF 



Name. 



Oktibbeha 



Fe. 



37-69 
37-24 



Ni. 



59-69 
62.01 



Co. 



.40 

-72 



Cu. 



Cr. 



.10 
•15 



Si. 



CI. 



In- 
sol. 



Miscellaneou*' 



Al. 
Ca, 



C. ATAXITES WITH ACCESSORY FORSTERITE. 

The accessory occurrence of forsterite is characteristic. It forms 
about five per cent of the mass, occurring in small spheroidal grains 
or elongated aggregates ot grains, and is accompanied by some plag- 
ioclase. In nickel-cobalt content the metallic portion of the meteorite 

Ataxites wnlfi 



Tucson 



(Carleton Iron). 



(Ainsa Iron) 



Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


s. 


C. 


Si.Oo 


CI. 


In- 

sol. 


85-54 
83-55 
81.56 
84.56 
84.60 


8.55 
9.20 
9.17 
8.89 
9.24 


.61 
-39 
-44 
1-36 
-95 


-03 
.01 

.08 

-03 
.02 


-17 

.02 
.02 


. 12 
-13 
-49 

.16 

-17 






3.02 
3*01 

3-63 
1.72 
1.76 






















tr. 
.01 


.04 
■ 04 


.04 
.04 





Miscellaneou 



MgO 2.04 IroOg 
Al.,03, tr, 
Labradorite . i , 
CaO .51 Mg02.i 
FeO .12 CaO 1 
MgO 2.43 
MgO . . . 
Chrys. res. 3. 
MgO . . . 
Chrvs.res. . •?. 



♦KaO, .10; NaaO, .17. 



1, 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



OUP. 



s. 


Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 






92.89 

99-99 
100.00 

96.89 
100.50 


5-75 

5.75-6.40-6.50 

6.82 


C. T.Jackson 

A. A. Hayes 

R. Knauer 


1838, A.J. S. (I), XXXIV, 335 






5 




1845, A.J. S. (1), XLVIII, 153 
1905, Meteoiitenkunde, III, 131 
1899, Ber. Berlin Akad., 607-608 






7.8593 


u 







OUP. 



anomalous composition. It may however for the present be included 
among- meteorites. 



>s. 



Undet. 



Total 



99.19 
100.40 



Sp. Gr. 



6.854 



Analyst. 



W. J. Taylor 
E. Cohen . . . 



Reference. 



1S57, A. J. S. (2), XXIV, 294 

1892, Meteoreisen-Studien, 11, A. N. fl., VII, m 



lies between the nickel-rich and nickel-poor ataxites. On etching, 
irregularly shaped areas appear, 0.2-2 cm. in area, which under the 
microscope have a spotted look and are generally bordered, as are 

! most of the silicate grains, by narrow, zigzag bands the nature of 

which cannot be further determined. 

:essory Forsterite. 



3. Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 




100.12 

100.55 

99.69 

101.09 

100.75 


6.52-7.13 

7.29 
7.2248 


J. L. Smith 


1855, A.J. S. (2), XIX, 161-162 
1855, A. J. S. (2), XX, 119-120 
1863, A.J. S. (2), XXXVI, 153 
1900, Cohen-Festschrift, Greifsw<ild, 39 


F. A. Genth 

G. J. Brush 


J. Fahrenhorst 

(1 



















I04 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

D. ATAXITES WITH CUBIC STREAKS. 

Upon etching appear bands or spots which seem to be oriented 
according to cubic faces, and which according to the position of the 
plates toward impinging light appear brighter or darker than the 
principal mass of the niclcel-iron without a structural distinction being j 
discernible. In one position the reflection of the whole face is plainly 
uniform. On weak etching appears, as a rule, a characteristic luster. 

Ataxites WIl 


\ 

Bl 


Name. 


Fe. 


Ni. 


Co. 


Cu. 


Cr. 


P. 


S. 


C. 


Si. 


CI. 


In- 
sol. 


Miscellaneow J, 


Cape of Good Hope 


78. QO 
85.61 
81.20 
81.30 
82.77 
82.87 
83-83 
83-49 
87.02 

83.24 
88.02 

80.74 
81.48 
82.21 
83.02 
82.17 


ii;.28 


I .0 

.89 
2.56 
2.01 
2.52 

•95 
.19 

-94 
.65 
1.07 












1 




Ca. 1. 41, -M. . 
Mg. .15, Mn. I, 
Graphite — i 




12 
15 
15 
14 
15 
15 
15 
12 

15 
8 

15 
17 
16 
16 
16 


27 
07 
23 
32 
67 
86 

41 
29 
76 
88 
73 
17 
69 
22 
?-> 




















<i 


tr. 
tr. 
tr. 
-03 


.04 


.09 
.08 
.26 
.09 
.05 
.07 
.02 
.08 


tr. 

tr. 








:95 


'.1 
Sn 1 

P. Fe. Ni. \ 
Sn 1 




ij 










<( 












„ 




-03 




.01 








Iquique 


.07 








.02 

tr. 

.01 


tr. 


.02 


-03 






1 
i 


















tr. 














Shingle Springs. . . 








3-5 


Sn 

P. etc 3 

Ca. .16, Al. 
Mg..oi, K.5 






















• " 


.60 
.65 
1.63 
1.42 


.02 
tr. 


.02 

.02 


-31 

-34 


.01 

.05 


■01 
-03 


-03 






■■ 










\ 








. II 


-13 




























































'a 


I 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 



105 



On strong etching the surface becomes dull with a peculiar velvet sheen. 
No cleavage has been observed. On the other hand, a certain orien- 
tation of similarly situated particles is indicated by the appearance in 
reflected light. The structure of the nickel-iron is compact; the con- 
tent in nickel plus cobalt 16-17 per cent. Except for the etch bands, 
the members of this group are similar in chemical composition and 
luster to the etched faces of members of the Morradal group. 
Bic Streaks. 



s. Undet. 


Total. 


Sp. Gr. 


Analyst. 


Reference. 





100.00 
98.77 
99.89 
99.50 
99.87 
99.69 

100.00 
99.98 
99.98 

100.16 

100.00 

100.00 

99.98 

100.01 
100.87 
100.05 


7-544 

7.66 


V. Holger 


1830, Zeit f. Phys. u. Math., VIII, 279-284 
1835, Zeit. f. Phys. u. Math. (2), III, 222-229 

1854, Ann. Chem. u. Pharm., XCI, 252 

1855, Ann. Chem. u. Pharm., XCVI, 243-246 
1867, Arch. Neerland, II, 376-384 

1900, Meteoreisen Studien, X, A. N. H., XV, 

87 

1873, Fest. Ges. Natur. Freunde, Berlin, 37 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 
XIII, 153 

1874, A. J. S. (3), VII, 392 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, VIII, A. N. H., 

XIII, 118-158 
1872. A.J. S. (3), III, 438 

1872, A. J. S. (3), IV, 495 

i873,A.J. S. (3).V,2i 

1898, Meteoreisen-Studien, IX, A. N. H., 

XIII, 479-480 

1892, A.J. S. (3), XLIII, 425 
1904, Ber. Berlin Akad., 151 


A. Wehrle 


6.6: 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7.87 
7 
7 


5-7-94 
60 

71 

8543 

925 

8334 
821 
8606 
80 

9053 
5-8.024 

8943 
694 


E. Uricoechea 

M. Booking 

BauiiihaueraiidSeellieim . . . 

J. Fahrenhorst 

C. Rammelsberg 

0. Sjostrom 

J. L. Smith 


0. Sjostrom 

C. U. Shepard 

C. T. Jackson 

F. A. Cairns 

0. Sjostrom 

E. Weinschenk 

Lindner 






- 










• 



io6 



Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 



ANALYSES OF OCCLUDED GASES. 

The occluded gases of nine iron meteorites have been determined. 
These are here shown. 



Name. 



Vols. 



Charlotte 

Cranbourne . . 

Lenarto 

Magura 

Red River. . . 

Rowton 

Shingle Springs 

Staunton 

Tazewell 



2.20 

3-59 
2.85 

47-13 
1 .29 
6.38 
0.97 
3-17 
3'i7 



H. 



CO2 



71.40 

45-79 
85.68 
18.19 

76.79 
77.78 
68.81 

35-83 
42.66 



13-30 
o. 12 



12.56 
8.59 
5-15 

13.64 

9-75 
14.40 



CO. 



15-30 
31.88 

4.46 
67-71 

14.62 

7-34 
12.47 

38-33 
41-23 



N. 



17.66 
g.86 
1-54 



9.72 

5- 

16.09 

1.71 



CH4 



4-55 



Analyst. 



Reference. 



A.W.Wright.. 

W. Flight 

Th. Graham . . . 
A. W. Wright.. 
A.W.Wright.. 

W. Flight 

A. W.Wright.. 
J. W. Mallet ... 
A.W.Wright.. 



1876, A.J. S. (3), XI, 257 

1882, Ph. Tr. Roy. Soc. Lon- 
don, 893 896 

1866, Proc. Roy. Soc, Lon- 
don, XV, 502-503 

1876, op. cit. 

1876, op. cit. 

1882, op. cit. 

1 876, op. cit. 

1871, Proc. Roy. Soc. London, 

XX, 365-370 
1876, op. cit. 





DISCUSSION OF ANALYSES. 

The most striking feature brought out by the analyses is the rela- 
tion shown between chemical composition and structure. This seems 
to be de.finite and general. All the meteorites of a hexahedral struc- 
ture have a nearly uniform composition, while among the octahedral 
meteorites, fineness of structure increases with increase of nickel. 
This conclusion can best be shown by obtaining the averages from the 
analyses of the different groups, omitting all obviously faulty analyses. 
The results thus obtained are as follows: 



Class. 

Hexahedrites — 

Coarsest Octahedrites- 

Coarse " 

Medium " 

Fine 

Finest " 



No. of 
Analyses. 

29 

12 

22 

88 

41 

13 



Width of 
Lamellae 
in Millimeters. 



+ 2.5 
2.0-1.5 
1.0-0.5 
0.4-0. 2 
o. 2 



Per Cent 
Fe. 

94.12 

93.18 

92.28 

90.64 

90.18 

88.51 



It is worthy of note that these averages are not means between 
wide limits, but are derived from nearly uniform values. Practically 



March, 1907. Ikon Meteorites — Farrington. 107 

all of the members of the classes conform in composition to the aver- 
age. Were all the groups equally well known, it is probable, too, that 
the gradation of percentage of Fe would be even more uniform than 
here shown. The medium octahedrites, for example, while numerous, 
have been as a whole imperfectly analyzed. Moreover, some of the 
meteorites classed as medium octahedrites, which are characterized 
by low percentage of iron, such as Algoma and Glorieta Mountain, 
have width of lamellae such as to place them near if not in the fine 
octahedrites. 

The apparent conclusion from the above results is, that the con- 
tent of nickel influences the structure. It may also account for the 
change from a hexahedral to an octahedral structure, since the irons 
with a hexahedral structure have the lowest per cent of nickel. So 
constant and definite does this relation hold, that given a certain struc- 
ture the per cent of nickel can probably be stated more accurately 
by this principle than it has been determined in some analyses. The 
per cent of nickel in iron meteorites as a whole, as shown by the re- 
liable analyses, lies between five and twenty-six per cent. An excep- 
tion to the latter figure may be found in the quoted analyses of Lime- 
stone Creek, but of this unfortunately no complete analysis exists. 
The somewhat doubtful Oktibbeha is also an exception, its percentage 
of nickel reaching sixty per cent. Cobalt in the iron meteorites rarely 
exceeds one per cent. No constant relation in amount appears to 
exist between it and nickel, although perhaps as a rule it is higher 
with higher nickel. Copper is doubtless, as claimed by Smith, a con- 
stant ingredient of iron meteorites. . It is usually only a few hundredths 
of one per cent in amount, but may reach a few tenths. Chromium 
is shown by the analyses to be a frequent though not constant ingre- 
dient in minute quantities. In many cases it is probably present as 
daubreelite, but also, as suggested by Cohen, it may occur as an ele- 
ment alloyed with nickel-iron. Reports of the presence of manganese 
and tin are so frequent as to leave little doubt that they occur in many 
iron meteorites, perhaps alloyed as metals. The presence of platinum 
and iridium has been proved by Davison in Coahuila and Franceville, 
and doubtless could be found to exist in more meteorites if proper 
search were made. Gold was reported in Boogaldi by Liversidge, but 
in so small a quantity as to make its determination as yet not quite 
positive. The presence of occluded gases has been determined in but 
few cases. The constant presence of phosphorus in iron meteorites 
is a feature shown by the analyses. Apparently no iron meteorite is 
lacking in this element altogether, and in amount and constancy it con- 



io8 Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

siderably exceeds sulphur. It probably occurs combined with nickel- 
iron as phosphide. Sulphur, though evident by its presence in many 
meteorites as troilite, does not appear in large amounts in the analyses, 
and does not seem to be so important or constant an ingredient as 
phosphorus. Carbon is probably more frequent in occurrence than 
analyses usually show, since of twenty-eight iron meteorites investi- 
gated by Cohen for carbon all but one showed appreciable percentages, 
ranging from .19 per cent to .012 per cent,* The silicon reported in 
the analyses is doubtless in some cases to be referred to silicate grains, 
but in other cases may be .free or combined with the iron as a silicide. 
The analyses make plain the incompleteness of much of the work 
which has been done hitherto. There can be little doubt that com- 
plete analyses of iron meteorites should always show iron, nickel, 
cobalt, copper, and phosphorus, and in most cases sulphur, carbon, 
and silicon. When considerable differences occur in the analyses of 
the same meteorite, as, for instance, 2 per cent of nickel reported in 
Burlington by Rockwell and nearly 9 per cent by Shepard, the difference 
is probably not to be regarded as due to the meteorite, but to the 
analyses. In a substance made up of different alloys and accessory 
minerals as are the iron meteorites, especially the octahedrites, there 
can be no question that portions from different parts of the meteorite 
would of necessity show unlike composition. How wide these varia- 
tions might legitimately be it is difficult to say, but some causes of 
error may be suggested. One of these is imperfect sampling. The 
l)roper method to secure material for mass analyses of an iron meteor- 
ite, especially if of octahedral structure, is to use dust obtained by 
boring. A mixture of the constituents of the meteorite is thus obtained 
which insures a better representation of its composition than is possible 
when only a fragment broken from some part of the surface is used. 
Such a fragment may contain an excess of taenite, or be largely com- 
posed of some accessory mineral so as to be far from representing the 
true constitution of the meteorite. Yet the larger number of analyses 
of iron meteorites have probably been made with fragments of this char- 
acter, and the wonder is, not that they show so much variation, but that 
they do not show more. Meteorites also doubtless vary in their homo- 
geneity, as shown especially by Canyon Diablo, in one portion of which 
Moissan found 2.89 per cent of nickel, and in another, only one centi- 
meter distant, 5.06 per cent. In another piece of Canyon Diablo 
two analyses made by the same analyst of material obtained at dis- 
tances of one centimeter showed 1.17 per cent and 7. 11 per cent of 

* Meteoritenkunde, Heft II., p. 243. 



March, 1907. Iron Meteorites — Farrington. 109 

nickel.* While few meteorites probably vary to this extent, such de- 
terminations show the need of as thorough sampling as possible if a 
mass analysis is to be made. Occasionally a marked variation in 
the analyses of a meteorite seems explicable only on the assumption 
that the material analyzed did not belong to that meteorite. Such, 
for instance, seems the most reasonable explanation for the percentage 
of nickel, 12.67 pei" cent, reported by Hayes for Limestone Creek, as 
compared with the percentages, 25-30 per cent, obtained by other 
analysts. Errors of this sort are obviously difficult to detect, and can 
only be surmised in extreme cases. Another and more serious cause 
of discrepancies in analyses is the imperfect separation by the analyst 
of nickel and cobalt from the iron. The methods for this separation 
are not altogether satisfactory, even at the present day, and in earlier 
years they were much less so. Consequently the results of the 
earlier analysts were for the most part too low in these ingredients. 
The determinations of specific gravity shown in the tables appear in 
some cases to have been equally open to sources of error with the 
analyses. It can easily be calculated that the specific gravity of an 
iron meteorite is likely to be between 7.6 and 7.9, since the specific 
gravity of pure iron, 7.85, will be increased by that of nickel, 8.8, 
according to the proportion of the latter. It will be decreased by 
accessory minerals, such as troilite, which has a specific gravity of 4.7, 
schreibersite, 6.5, graphite, 2.2, and oxidized ingredients. Any poros- 
ity of the meteorite will also lessen its specific gravity. It is obvious, 
therefore, that determinations of specific gravity made on small frag- 
ments can hardly represent that of the mass as a whole, since they 
may contain a disproportionate quantity of accessory ingredients or 
may be more oxidized than the main mass. It is hardly credible that 
porosity or accessory ingredients of a meteorite would in any case 
reduce its specific gravity below 7. Determinations below this figure, 
therefore, probably indicate that oxidized material was used. From 
the showing in the tables that large numbers of meteorites have prac- 
tically similar composition, it is evident that similarity of composition 
cannot be used, as has often been done hitherto, to prove identity of 
origin of meteorites found at different places. This method at one 
time obtained considerable vogue. Dissimilarity of composition, on 
the other hand, as a rule indicates separate falls. The only marked 
exception to this rule seems to be furnished by the two masses of 
Babb's Mill, one of which shows about 11 per cent, the other about 
17 per cent, of nickel. The only alternative supposition possible here 

* C. R., 1893, cxvi., 290. 



iio Field Columbian Museum — Geology, Vol. III. 

is that two ataxites fell at different times at one locality. In view 
of the small number of ataxites. known, this seems less likely than 
to suppose that two masses of the same fall differed in composition. 
No other case of such marked difference is known. Differences of 
structure seem as a rule to be a better criterion for distinguishing mete- 
orites than differences of composition. On the other hand, similarity 
of structure and composition together do not positively identify 
meteorites found at different places as belonging to one fall, since 
such similarities occur in meteorites seen to fall at widely different 
times and places. Of the nine iron meteorites seen to fall, four are 
medium octahedrites and have practically similar compositions. In 
correlating individual meteorites, therefore, all possible characters 
must be taken into consideration, including the circumstances of 
their find, the appearance of their exterior, the probable time elapsed 
since their fall, etc. 

No attempt has been made by the writer at summation of the 
analyses here given, in order to determine the average composition of 
iron meteorites. Such a summation, if worthy of being performed at 
all, will be deferred until analyses of the iron-stone and stone meteor- 
ites are also at hand for comparison. This work the writer hopes to 
accomplish in the near future. It is obvious, however, from an inspec- 
tion of the tables that the average percentage of iron in iron meteor- 
ites as a whole is not far from 91 per cent, while that of nickel closely 
approximates 7.50 per cent. It is doubtful if the average percentage 
of the remaining minor constituents can be learned by summation of 
existing analyses. Not only have these constituents in many cases 
not been determined, but also any slight error in analyses or sampling- 
would double or multiple their percentage. A percentage of .4 of 
cobalt, for instance, as compared with .2, is within the limits of error 
of many analyses, yet one percentage is double that of the other. The 
same is true in much greater degree of determinations of the amount 
of copper and other constituents. Until a larger number of complete 
and accurate determinations are at hand, therefore, summations of 
these constituents seem to have little value. One point in the compo- 
sition of iron meteorites which may or may not be of significance may 
be noted. Of the four constant metallic constituents, the most 
abundant, iron, has the lowest atomic weight, the next in quantity, 
nickel, is next higher, and so on for cobalt and copper. This grada- 
tion, using percentages common in iron meteorites, appears as follows: 

Iron. Nickel. Cobalt. Copper. 

Per cent in iron meteorites 90 9 0.9 0.02 

Atomic weight 55.5 58.3 58.6 63.1 



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